The Palladium

The design of the Palladium is based upon the traditional ‘shoe box’ shape concert hall with high ceilings and massive, sound-reflecting walls. This cornerstone of the Carmel City Center is designed to accommodate a myriad of music types.

The performance hall is designed as a multi-purpose space, yet its principal use is for live symphonic music. Through the design process it was decided that a truly multi-purpose room would not meet the highest standards for music production, however a room built for symphonic music can support many other types of events. In true concert hall fashion, the hall was developed as a single room, meaning there is no separation between the audience and the performers. This allows the initial sound to radiate freely without the constriction of a proscenium wall.

Within the hall, acoustics are further refined with the utilization of variable acoustic devices including automated curtains and a one-of-a-kind glass and steel acoustic canopy. The facility also includes state-of-the-art production lighting and sound systems with the capability to handle almost any production.

The space is designed to accommodate all patrons with visually excellent sight lines. The seating mix includes distinct locations including main floor, choral balcony, balcony, and box seats with private anterooms.

CSO was commissioned by the City of Carmel and the Carmel Redevelopment Commission to serve as the Architect of Record on The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts.  The firm worked with David M. Schwarz Architects and Artec Consultants, Inc. to design the only true concert hall in the region.

Artistry

The Artistry project revitalizes an area of downtown Indianapolis that had seemingly been forgotten. Phase 1 of the project provides an adaptive reuse solution to the former Bank One Operations Center structure by converting it to a 362,000 square foot mixed-use development, including four stories of apartments and amenity spaces over parking, office, and retail space at grade. This LEED for Homes Silver certified project defines a new gateway into the city and has served as a catalyst for development within the newly defined “Market East Cultural District. Phase 1 is considered to be the main building within a four-building mixed use development. The goals for Phase 1 were to design a building that would:

      • Serve as a gateway and catalyst for the revitalization of the Market East Cultural District.
      • Create a vibrant mixed-use development through the adaptive reuse of the former Bank One Operations Center.
      • Emphasize an urban industrial aesthetic through the physical reuse of the existing building structure.
      • Promote an urban apartment community that is enhanced by its dynamic outdoor living environment.

CSO went on to design Phase 2 of the project, which involved the addition of two buildings, the Mentor and Muse at Artistry, which provide additional living options to fit different types of lifestyles, including 354 square foot eco-suites for those who need minimal space.

Phase I of the project was particularly challenging due to the owner’s intent to build up from an existing structure. The configuration of the existing structure required that designers incorporate a number of potentially awkward column locations. Ultimately, this became a feature of the building design as the column placement dictated a wide array of residential unit variations and influenced the façade. By addressing these challenges with unique design solutions, the owner is able to offer tenants more layout options and the building boasts a more dynamic façade that brings new life to the streetscape. An open third floor pool and recreation deck provides dramatic views of the downtown area for all residents along with two interior courtyards featuring a fountain, vegetable garden, bocce court, and putting green.

Park Hall

Park Hall was the first new residence hall on Ball State University’s campus since 1969.  Initially conceived as part of an area-specific master plan, Park Hall became the cornerstone of the redevelopment of the eastern residential quadrant of campus, which grew to include the renovation of adjacent housing and dining facilities.

The building houses 500 students, with a focus on double occupancy private units clustered around semi-private bathrooms. Amenity spaces include a multi-purpose room, classrooms, music practice rooms, and laundry facilities. Additional spaces including large 2-story student lounges and informal gathering spaces round out the living-learning experience.

As the first project on Ball State’s campus designed to receive LEED certification, a tremendous amount of planning went in to developing sustainable strategies which were not a detriment to the long-term maintenance of the building. Ultimately, the building achieved LEED Silver certification, exceeding the initial goals set for the project.