Honors College and Residences

Purdue University envisioned an interdisciplinary living-learning community that would serve as a centralized hub for the students, administration, and academic spaces associated with their Honors College program.  As their only academic residential college, the University’s goal was to provide students with an environment purposefully designed for state-of-the-art active learning.

The academic spaces consist of approximately 40,000 square feet to accommodate faculty and staff offices, classrooms, innovation space, and study spaces. Learning and leadership opportunities include a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and agriculture, math) research lab, active learning studios, and an Innovation Forum – featuring an interactive, programmable floor – provides a showcase for student projects.

The “Great Hall”, a flexible space that can be configured to seat more than 400 for lectures, presentations, and events, is the centerpiece of the Honors College. The space is located in the center of the community with access to a primary campus path and greenspace.

The two buildings that make up the community – each with academic space and residential space – are located within the University’s “student success corridor.” Over 800 students live in clusters of roughly 24 students in pod configurations complemented by community and social areas designed to foster informal interaction and collaboration.

Wells Quadrangle Residence Halls and Dining Facility

Wells Quadrangle is comprised of four buildings, including Memorial Hall and Goodbody Hall. The project involved repurposing both buildings from academic space to student housing. The University also wanted to determine the best location to accommodate a dining facility with an outdoor terrace. Originally, IU had targeted space in one of the other buildings in the quad, but a study led by CSO determined that an addition to Goodbody Hall would be the best solution to accommodate a 200-seat dining facility.

The design of the addition to Goodbody Hall required a solution that integrated seamlessly into the architectural character of Wells Quadrangle. The 1-story addition emerges from the base of the existing Goodbody Hall, and houses a dining area with open views toward the quad.  A roof terrace above is accessed from both the exterior grade and the second level.  This elevated terrace provides options for outdoor seating and a sweeping overlook to the quad.

The overall project required careful coordination to maximize usable space while accommodating updated MEP systems and the technology infrastructure demanded by today’s residence halls.

The renovation created accommodations for 174 students. The room configuration is comprised of a mix of 2-bedroom apartments, 2-bedrooms suites, single rooms, and double rooms. A variety of restroom configurations are available depending on the room type.

Park Hall

Park Hall was the first new residence hall on Ball State University’s campus since 1969.  Initially conceived as part of an area-specific master plan, Park Hall became the cornerstone of the redevelopment of the eastern residential quadrant of campus, which grew to include the renovation of adjacent housing and dining facilities.

The building houses 500 students, with a focus on double occupancy private units clustered around semi-private bathrooms. Amenity spaces include a multi-purpose room, classrooms, music practice rooms, and laundry facilities. Additional spaces including large 2-story student lounges and informal gathering spaces round out the living-learning experience.

As the first project on Ball State’s campus designed to receive LEED certification, a tremendous amount of planning went in to developing sustainable strategies which were not a detriment to the long-term maintenance of the building. Ultimately, the building achieved LEED Silver certification, exceeding the initial goals set for the project.

New Residence Halls

CSO is working with the University of Louisville to design two new residence halls to replace Threlkeld and Miller Halls. In order to maintain enough housing to meet the University’s current needs, the 5-story, 452-bed buildings will be constructed in two phases. For the purpose of efficiency, floor plans for each phase are similar and include traditional-style double- and single-bedroom units arranged around a group of private-use bathrooms.

The buildings are designed to maximize the use of exterior spaces and to engage the students in active areas of living and learning. Amenities for each new facility will include a large multi-purpose room, collaboration spaces, a recreation/game room, a community kitchen, and multiple student lounges. As Design Architect on the project, CSO teamed with JRA Architects, of Louisville, as the architect of record for the project.