North Residential Neighborhood Dining Facility

During the planning process, careful consideration was given to the facility’s location in relation to campus, and nearby residence halls. The design includes spaces for dining, collaboration, and studying. The facility will provide 685 seats in a variety of seating areas and offer Micro-Restaurant style dining with seven to nine different restaurant concepts. Centralized prep kitchen and dish washing areas, along with other back-of-house spaces, will support the dining operations. Dining and kitchen spaces are located on the main level.

In addition to dining, the facility will house the administrative offices for Dining & Food Services and Housing & Residence Life. These office facilities will be on a second level, with a designated entrance along McKinley Ave. This project was designed in collaboration with Hanbury.

Dr. Don Shondell Practice Center

The Dr. Don Shondell Practice Center is a new building located adjacent to Worthen Arena which is home to the Ball State University Cardinal’s basketball and volleyball teams. The main area of the facility provides a new practice gymnasium and includes two, full-sized NCAA-compliant basketball and volleyball practice courts. The facility is accessible from Worthen Arena to provide access to existing locker and restroom facilities.

The connector between the two buildings has two levels. The main level provides an exterior entrance to the Practice Center with access to the courts and space for a team room with tiered seating, a training room, and courtside storage space. The second level aligns with Worthen Arena’s concourse level where there is access to two new meeting rooms that overlook the new practice courts.

The namesake of the facility, Dr. Don Shondell, established an impressive legacy as a men’s volleyball coach as well as the founder of the volleyball team at Ball State University.

Charles W. Brown Planetarium

The addition of the Charles W. Brown Planetarium replaced existing facilities in the Cooper Science complex. The planetarium features state of the art projection technology to enhance the teaching capabilities of BSU’s Astronomy Department. The instruments housed within the facility are a hybrid combination of both optical and digital projectors. This combination of old and new technology provides a wide ranging capability to not only display the sky but also to project animations and interactive digital information to augment the optical projection.

In keeping with BSU’s goals for the project, the architectural vocabulary and materials mimic that of the original building.

To replicate the silence of outer space, the building shell had to be capable of excluding all external low frequency noise sources such as emergency vehicles on their way to the nearby Ball Memorial Hospital. To accomplish this, a combination of grouted masonry walls and a cast-in-place concrete dome are utilized. Interior walls are acoustically isolated from the building shell to isolate the theater from outside noise.

To complete the near silent environment the mechanical system was designed utilizing sound deadened ductwork to deliver low velocity air above the perforated projection dome. All mechanical systems are heavily isolated to prevent the transmission of both sound and vibration to the structure. Any vibration of the structure would significantly degrade the quality of the projection on the skydome.

The facility provides unique teaching capabilities to the Department of Astronomy and an unparalleled opportunity to the University and surrounding community to learn about our universe.

Park Hall

Park Hall was the first new residence hall on Ball State University’s campus since 1969.  Initially conceived as part of an area-specific master plan, Park Hall became the cornerstone of the redevelopment of the eastern residential quadrant of campus, which grew to include the renovation of adjacent housing and dining facilities.

The building houses 500 students, with a focus on double occupancy private units clustered around semi-private bathrooms. Amenity spaces include a multi-purpose room, classrooms, music practice rooms, and laundry facilities. Additional spaces including large 2-story student lounges and informal gathering spaces round out the living-learning experience.

As the first project on Ball State’s campus designed to receive LEED certification, a tremendous amount of planning went in to developing sustainable strategies which were not a detriment to the long-term maintenance of the building. Ultimately, the building achieved LEED Silver certification, exceeding the initial goals set for the project.

North Residential Neighborhood New Residence Hall

Ball State University’s Education Living Learning Community will provide a new home for over 500 students. Located in the North Neighborhood Development of campus, the building is comprised of two residence towers, containing a community of 250 students per tower. Student rooms are mostly double configuration, with a mix of single and ADA compliant rooms per wing. Each floor contains approximately 27 rooms, including one Resident Assistant room. Bathroom facilities are arranged in four groups per typical floor, containing shared lavatory space and private toilet/shower compartments. Each residential floor of each tower has a dedicated lounge and kitchen space.

A central connector between each tower houses shared facilities such as laundry, group study, lounge, fitness center, mail, and administrative office spaces. Included in this two-story connector is a large multi-purpose room for the community, as well as designated Living-Learning maker spaces for Education. This connector acts as the main entry to the complex.