North Residential Neighborhood Dining Facility

During the planning process, careful consideration was given to the facility’s location in relation to campus, and nearby residence halls. The design includes spaces for dining, collaboration, and studying. The facility will provide 685 seats in a variety of seating areas and offer Micro-Restaurant style dining with seven to nine different restaurant concepts. Centralized prep kitchen and dish washing areas, along with other back-of-house spaces, will support the dining operations. Dining and kitchen spaces are located on the main level.

In addition to dining, the facility will house the administrative offices for Dining & Food Services and Housing & Residence Life. These office facilities will be on a second level, with a designated entrance along McKinley Ave. This project was designed in collaboration with Hanbury.

Artistry

The Artistry project revitalizes an area of downtown Indianapolis that had seemingly been forgotten. Phase 1 of the project provides an adaptive reuse solution to the former Bank One Operations Center structure by converting it to a 362,000 square foot mixed-use development, including four stories of apartments and amenity spaces over parking, office, and retail space at grade. This LEED for Homes Silver certified project defines a new gateway into the city and has served as a catalyst for development within the newly defined “Market East Cultural District. Phase 1 is considered to be the main building within a four-building mixed use development. The goals for Phase 1 were to design a building that would:

      • Serve as a gateway and catalyst for the revitalization of the Market East Cultural District.
      • Create a vibrant mixed-use development through the adaptive reuse of the former Bank One Operations Center.
      • Emphasize an urban industrial aesthetic through the physical reuse of the existing building structure.
      • Promote an urban apartment community that is enhanced by its dynamic outdoor living environment.

CSO went on to design Phase 2 of the project, which involved the addition of two buildings, the Mentor and Muse at Artistry, which provide additional living options to fit different types of lifestyles, including 354 square foot eco-suites for those who need minimal space.

Phase I of the project was particularly challenging due to the owner’s intent to build up from an existing structure. The configuration of the existing structure required that designers incorporate a number of potentially awkward column locations. Ultimately, this became a feature of the building design as the column placement dictated a wide array of residential unit variations and influenced the façade. By addressing these challenges with unique design solutions, the owner is able to offer tenants more layout options and the building boasts a more dynamic façade that brings new life to the streetscape. An open third floor pool and recreation deck provides dramatic views of the downtown area for all residents along with two interior courtyards featuring a fountain, vegetable garden, bocce court, and putting green.

HealthNow New York

Prominently located next to the New York Niagara Section Thruway on an abandoned brownfield site, the largest building in 20 years in Buffalo helped encourage economic development in the area. The design utilizes an 1859 stone façade to maintain historic preservation of the site’s past while incorporating a curved glass curtain wall. The curtain wall not only offers magnificent views of Lake Erie, but its southern exposure provides a valuable component of the building’s sustainable design.

The north, east, and west façades are a detailed colored architectural precast concrete with large window openings, recalling brick waterfront warehouses.  The entry plaza reflects the shifted city grids of the waterfront and downtown. The building is set back from the thruway, allowing the site development of a landscaped “greenway”, and screening a 1,500-car employee parking structure with an enclosed employee pedestrian bridge connection.

Sustainable design features include the development of an urban brownfield site; the southern glass curtain wall with low-e glazing and sunscreens with motorized shades and light sensors for solar control, day lighting and views; energy efficient mechanical and electrical systems; and the use of “green” building materials and construction practices.

Cummins Office Building

The building design focuses on sustainable features, including a highly detailed southern exposure curtain wall.  The articulated glass curtain wall features floor to ceiling windows which provides day-lighting and exterior views throughout.

Primarily planned for an open office workplace with internal offices, the upper floors have a central building core.  Glass enclosed conference rooms are located on the southeast and southwest corners with great views of the downtown square.  A flexible employee dining and conference center are located on the first floor southeast corner, with direct access to the adjacent Commons food court.

The primary emphasis for the open office workplace is natural light and expansive views out.  The southern façade daylighting is controlled with louvered sunscreen shading, shades, and photocell controlled perimeter lighting.  The western windows are shaded with vertical sun fins and occasional translucent glass.  The clear glass is insulated with low-e coating.  Energy-efficient lighting and mechanical systems were critical for lower operating costs.

Three years after the initial building was completed, a five-story addition was built adjacent to the existing building. The exterior façades were designed with varying heights in order to allow for a four-story atrium that joins the two buildings and a three-story front on the north side of the building to match the adjacent Commons building. The fourth floor of the addition features a corner terrace and a vegetated green roof. CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim Architects and Associates to design the original building and the addition.

Governor Mitch Daniels Barracks Complex

CSO was retained by the Military Department of Indiana for the design of one of two new complexes for Camp Atterbury. The facility provides barracks for over 600 soldiers in standard modified two-story design. The project was designed in accordance with the requirements of UFC 4-171-05 Army Reserve Facilities, 4-010-01 anti-terrorism force protection.

The project includes billeting facilities in a barracks-style configuration, as well as 2+2 sleeping quarters for the non-commissioned officers associated with each wing. A television lounge, internet café, laundry, and latrine facilities are provided with each set of barracks. Two Bachelor Officer Quarters house 80 soldiers in a semi-private 2+2 arrangement.

A 30,000 square foot dining facility serving the complex is also included. The project is the first phase of a new complex just north of the existing Camp Atterbury campus that will house 6,000 soldiers.

Indianapolis Fire Station #5

This new firehouse is home to Engine 5, Tactical 5, IEMS Medic 5, Battalion 1, IFD Arson Investigation and the IFD Public Information Officer. The design includes five apparatus bay positions with two being drive-through lanes, dormitories, locker rooms, home theater room, workout room, commercial kitchen, and separate quarters for the battalion chief.

The Collapse Rescue Tactical Unit includes a classroom and workshop, along with indoor and outdoor collapse rescue simulators. The simulators provide opportunities for the CRT Unit to train within confined spaces, trenches, fluid tanks, a collapsed material maze, and a simulated partial building collapse for compromised openings and heavy structure collapse.

The City of Indianapolis, Department of Public Safety, and Indianapolis Fire Department entered into a build-to-suit agreement with a private development company to develop the new Indianapolis Fire Station No. 5 on a lease-to-own basis.

Park Hall

Park Hall was the first new residence hall on Ball State University’s campus since 1969.  Initially conceived as part of an area-specific master plan, Park Hall became the cornerstone of the redevelopment of the eastern residential quadrant of campus, which grew to include the renovation of adjacent housing and dining facilities.

The building houses 500 students, with a focus on double occupancy private units clustered around semi-private bathrooms. Amenity spaces include a multi-purpose room, classrooms, music practice rooms, and laundry facilities. Additional spaces including large 2-story student lounges and informal gathering spaces round out the living-learning experience.

As the first project on Ball State’s campus designed to receive LEED certification, a tremendous amount of planning went in to developing sustainable strategies which were not a detriment to the long-term maintenance of the building. Ultimately, the building achieved LEED Silver certification, exceeding the initial goals set for the project.