Brownsburg High School Renovation and Addition

Following a series of community engagement sessions in 2016, the Brownsburg Board of School Trustees decided that in order to address enrollment growth in grades 9-12 and failing infrastructure at Brownsburg High School, it was necessary to expand and renovate the school.

New academic, administrative, athletic, foodservice, and building support spaces will increase the capacity of the high school to 3,000 students and allow for future growth of an additional 1,000 students. Major demolition of a significant portion of the existing building provided the opportunity to add 23% more classroom space, expand auditorium seating to accommodate approximately 995 people, and improve overall corridor circulation. The demolished area was rebuilt taking a portion of the building from a single story to two stories housing classrooms and taller spaces such as the cafeteria and Large Group Instruction rooms.

An existing auditorium was transformed into a true performing arts theater. The new theater design involved expanding the auditorium with new sloped and stadium seating, a new orchestra pit, front of stage area, overhead catwalks, and new lighting and sound systems.

The school has been operational throughout the entire construction process, which has occurred in phases to lessen the impact on students.

The Palladium

The design of the Palladium is based upon the traditional ‘shoe box’ shape concert hall with high ceilings and massive, sound-reflecting walls. This cornerstone of the Carmel City Center is designed to accommodate a myriad of music types.

The performance hall is designed as a multi-purpose space, yet its principal use is for live symphonic music. Through the design process it was decided that a truly multi-purpose room would not meet the highest standards for music production, however a room built for symphonic music can support many other types of events. In true concert hall fashion, the hall was developed as a single room, meaning there is no separation between the audience and the performers. This allows the initial sound to radiate freely without the constriction of a proscenium wall.

Within the hall, acoustics are further refined with the utilization of variable acoustic devices including automated curtains and a one-of-a-kind glass and steel acoustic canopy. The facility also includes state-of-the-art production lighting and sound systems with the capability to handle almost any production.

The space is designed to accommodate all patrons with visually excellent sight lines. The seating mix includes distinct locations including main floor, choral balcony, balcony, and box seats with private anterooms.

CSO was commissioned by the City of Carmel and the Carmel Redevelopment Commission to serve as the Architect of Record on The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts.  The firm worked with David M. Schwarz Architects and Artec Consultants, Inc. to design the only true concert hall in the region.

Charles W. Brown Planetarium

The addition of the Charles W. Brown Planetarium replaced existing facilities in the Cooper Science complex. The planetarium features state of the art projection technology to enhance the teaching capabilities of BSU’s Astronomy Department. The instruments housed within the facility are a hybrid combination of both optical and digital projectors. This combination of old and new technology provides a wide ranging capability to not only display the sky but also to project animations and interactive digital information to augment the optical projection.

In keeping with BSU’s goals for the project, the architectural vocabulary and materials mimic that of the original building.

To replicate the silence of outer space, the building shell had to be capable of excluding all external low frequency noise sources such as emergency vehicles on their way to the nearby Ball Memorial Hospital. To accomplish this, a combination of grouted masonry walls and a cast-in-place concrete dome are utilized. Interior walls are acoustically isolated from the building shell to isolate the theater from outside noise.

To complete the near silent environment the mechanical system was designed utilizing sound deadened ductwork to deliver low velocity air above the perforated projection dome. All mechanical systems are heavily isolated to prevent the transmission of both sound and vibration to the structure. Any vibration of the structure would significantly degrade the quality of the projection on the skydome.

The facility provides unique teaching capabilities to the Department of Astronomy and an unparalleled opportunity to the University and surrounding community to learn about our universe.

Alpha

Named by the students of University of Alabama, this 696-bed, 263-unit student housing community offers fully furnished one, two, three, and four bedroom apartments. The project scope involved two sites located on the north and south sides of 13th Street East in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The buildings consist of a combination of 3-story (Type V) and 5 story (Type III) wood framed construction. The northern site includes a 3 level precast concrete parking structure and the southern site includes a single level cast-in-place concrete podium parking structure. The Alpha features a broad array of amenities including a 24-hour fitness center, leasing office, theater and gaming area, computer café, private study lounges, an expansive clubhouse, and garage parking. Outdoor amenities include a grilling area, fire pit, resort-style pool, and sundeck.