Indianapolis International Airport, Col. H. Weir Cook Terminal

The terminal at the Indianapolis International Airport is a modern, dual-level terminal located midfield between the two main runways. The terminal is designed as a dynamic, changing form that reveals its purpose as a destination, gateway, and powerful symbol of the city. The first complete airport campus to earn LEED certification, the airport is built for growth and flexibility well into the future.

CSO directed and coordinated the design development, construction documents, bidding, and construction administration phases of this seven-year project. The firm displayed the key skills that airport planners were looking for to lead this partnership, including; the ability to collaborate with the Design Architect and other consultants; an outstanding track record in partnerships with Disadvantaged, Minority, and Women Business Enterprises; and experience with large, multifaceted projects that demand aggressive scheduling and multiple bid package experience. This project was designed in collaboration with HOK.

Honors College and Residences

Purdue University envisioned an interdisciplinary living-learning community that would serve as a centralized hub for the students, administration, and academic spaces associated with their Honors College program.  As their only academic residential college, the University’s goal was to provide students with an environment purposefully designed for state-of-the-art active learning.

The academic spaces consist of approximately 40,000 square feet to accommodate faculty and staff offices, classrooms, innovation space, and study spaces. Learning and leadership opportunities include a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and agriculture, math) research lab, active learning studios, and an Innovation Forum – featuring an interactive, programmable floor – provides a showcase for student projects.

The “Great Hall”, a flexible space that can be configured to seat more than 400 for lectures, presentations, and events, is the centerpiece of the Honors College. The space is located in the center of the community with access to a primary campus path and greenspace.

The two buildings that make up the community – each with academic space and residential space – are located within the University’s “student success corridor.” Over 800 students live in clusters of roughly 24 students in pod configurations complemented by community and social areas designed to foster informal interaction and collaboration.

The Palladium

The design of the Palladium is based upon the traditional ‘shoe box’ shape concert hall with high ceilings and massive, sound-reflecting walls. This cornerstone of the Carmel City Center is designed to accommodate a myriad of music types.

The performance hall is designed as a multi-purpose space, yet its principal use is for live symphonic music. Through the design process it was decided that a truly multi-purpose room would not meet the highest standards for music production, however a room built for symphonic music can support many other types of events. In true concert hall fashion, the hall was developed as a single room, meaning there is no separation between the audience and the performers. This allows the initial sound to radiate freely without the constriction of a proscenium wall.

Within the hall, acoustics are further refined with the utilization of variable acoustic devices including automated curtains and a one-of-a-kind glass and steel acoustic canopy. The facility also includes state-of-the-art production lighting and sound systems with the capability to handle almost any production.

The space is designed to accommodate all patrons with visually excellent sight lines. The seating mix includes distinct locations including main floor, choral balcony, balcony, and box seats with private anterooms.

CSO was commissioned by the City of Carmel and the Carmel Redevelopment Commission to serve as the Architect of Record on The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts.  The firm worked with David M. Schwarz Architects and Artec Consultants, Inc. to design the only true concert hall in the region.

The Depot at Nickel Plate

The Depot at Nickel Plate provides an upscale blend of residential and retail space in a pedestrian friendly mixed-use development that helped launch the revitalization of downtown Fishers.

The lower level of the mixed-use development consists of approximately 17,000 square feet of retail, dining, and entertainment space as well as a 430-space cast-in-place parking garage. The Depot at Nickel Plate amenities includes two exterior courtyards, a fitness center, pool, leasing office, and community lounge areas.

Conveniently located just blocks from parks, trails, and Interstate 69, The Depot at Nickel Plate is the prime location for anyone looking to enjoy all that Fishers has to offer. Each apartment is equipped with stainless steel EnergyStar appliances, granite countertops, oversized soaking tubs, energy efficient lighting, and wood style flooring.

The Commons

Through a long series of meetings and public planning sessions, resulting in the review of over 5000 survey responses, the City and the building owners decided to demolish the original building and rebuild on the same site. Input revealed the following priorities for the new design.

      • Creating a new and improved performance space
      • Expanding and improving the indoor playground
      • Adding more informal and formal public meeting spaces
      • Including more food and restaurant opportunities
      • Maintaining the sculpture, “Chaos 1,” by Jean Tinguely, which was a highlight of the development’s original interior

The new Commons provides public meeting and performance areas, a playground, restaurants, and a commons area in the center.

Early in the design process, prior to demolition, it was determined that the new facility would pay tribute to the original by keeping the steel superstructure of the original building as well as leaving the beloved sculpture, Chaos 1, exactly where it has always stood. Consequently, demolition was very selective.

The newly created main entrance to the building features zigzag windows that are acoustical as well as architectural, framing views down the main street. Escalators and stairs wrap around the Chaos 1 sculpture, in its original location, to create a commons space and draw people to the second floor activities.

A new second floor under the original building’s structure provides space for the multi-purpose performance and activity space. The upper level space is designed for flexibility to accommodate public community events, performances, and private events.

A corner glass pavilion is skewed and sloped, providing views of the corner courthouse tower while creating an intriguing space to house a new indoor playground featuring a custom designed interactive sculpture that serves as a “climber” for children.

Natural daylighting, energy efficient lighting and mechanical system, and a vegetated green roof on the new structure assist with making this a sustainable project.

CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim to complete this project.

Axis

The building provides easy and efficient access to all home, work, and leisure destinations and consists of retail space, a 47,000 square foot grocery store on the first floor, and 325 luxury residential units wrapped around a 435 space parking structure.

CSO’s designers combined functionality with beauty and form through the use of architectural mesh on the exterior of the parking garage. The transparency of the mesh acts as a natural ventilation system, which reduces the need for the need for costly HVAC systems. The use of mesh results in an abundance of natural light and air flow through the garage, permitting car emissions to be dispersed outside and improving the air quality in the space.

Each apartment portrays a modern design and reflects an updated interior that permeates the living space with the ultimate in luxury. Units feature distinctively styled rooms and luxurious accommodations. The one- and two-bedroom units feature granite countertops, roman soaking tubs, and stainless steel appliances. Supported by fabulous amenities and unrivaled community features, Axis includes 37,000 square feet of combined interior and exterior play space, including a Sky Bar with city views, an Aqua Lounge, a heated resort-style pool, 24-hour state-of-the-art fitness center, and a Great Lawn open area with lounge areas, a garden, and a fire pit.

American Red Cross Indiana Region Headquarters

Through collaboration and funding with the City of Indianapolis, and donor support, Red Cross was able to achieve their goal of building a new, more efficient headquarters. The new building’s reduced footprint and efficient use of space allows the American Red Cross (ARC) to commit more dollars to what they do best: always being there in times of need. Flexible training rooms, a community center, teaming areas, local office spaces, and huddle spaces encapsulate the programs within the headquarters, creating an environment that promotes interaction where employees and volunteers feel energized and accommodated. Employees are not assigned desks or specific work spaces so the design of the facility is very flexible and adaptable. Amenities include a rooftop terrace that creates a respite and wellness destination, and a coffee house that connects and creates community.

The building is extremely sustainable, with the exterior wrapped in red brick, seamlessly blending in with the surrounding architectural aesthetic. The headquarters has large windows that welcome natural light creating a community-oriented atmosphere and providing views of the surrounding neighborhood of downtown Indianapolis. In addition, a key branding focal point is incorporated on the interior corridor that displays historical Red Cross artifacts, local to Indianapolis. The iconic, ARC-branded “red” is carried throughout the headquarters. The American Red Cross new Indiana Regional Headquarters is the first Red Cross facility to reflect new design standards developed for the organization by Perkins + Will.
Photography: © James Steinkamp

Zionsville Town Hall

Prior to building this new Town Hall, the administrative offices for the Town of Zionsville were housed in a former church. A lack of functionality prompted the need for a new building that would allow public service officials to better serve the community. The new building provides an efficient workplace for Town offices including Clerk/Treasurer, Planning and Permitting, Mayor, Information Technology, Fire Department Offices, and Town Council Chambers.

Designed with the public in mind, the building features a large community room for meetings and events. The design included 5,000 square feet on the second floor to accommodate future growth. The building is also designed to allow for expansion on its southwest side, as the needs of the community continue to expand.

CSO provided complete FF&E services in addition to the design of the building. The design features a central lobby with various departments and payment centers, space for planning and economic development, and offices for the mayor and other staff.

Bulldog Park

Bulldog Park includes a National Hockey League-sized ice rink, an outdoor amphitheater, and a two-story building. The area between the building and ice skating rink is designed to serve various seasonal purposes and includes a splash pad feature for summer use. The ice rink is the only outdoor NHL-sized ice rink in Northwest Indiana.

The ice rink is designed for use at temperatures up to 45 degrees. This enables the City to offer ice-skating without having to wait for the temperature to drop to freeze the ice naturally.

The city anticipates hosting various events at the venue including a farmer’s market, car shows, and performances. They also expect that the public will use the various spaces for private events such as wedding receptions.

The two-story building provides a new home for the city’s Special Events and Parks Department offices and Senior Center.

Artistry

The Artistry project revitalizes an area of downtown Indianapolis that had seemingly been forgotten. Phase 1 of the project provides an adaptive reuse solution to the former Bank One Operations Center structure by converting it to a 362,000 square foot mixed-use development, including four stories of apartments and amenity spaces over parking, office, and retail space at grade. This LEED for Homes Silver certified project defines a new gateway into the city and has served as a catalyst for development within the newly defined “Market East Cultural District. Phase 1 is considered to be the main building within a four-building mixed use development. The goals for Phase 1 were to design a building that would:

      • Serve as a gateway and catalyst for the revitalization of the Market East Cultural District.
      • Create a vibrant mixed-use development through the adaptive reuse of the former Bank One Operations Center.
      • Emphasize an urban industrial aesthetic through the physical reuse of the existing building structure.
      • Promote an urban apartment community that is enhanced by its dynamic outdoor living environment.

CSO went on to design Phase 2 of the project, which involved the addition of two buildings, the Mentor and Muse at Artistry, which provide additional living options to fit different types of lifestyles, including 354 square foot eco-suites for those who need minimal space.

Phase I of the project was particularly challenging due to the owner’s intent to build up from an existing structure. The configuration of the existing structure required that designers incorporate a number of potentially awkward column locations. Ultimately, this became a feature of the building design as the column placement dictated a wide array of residential unit variations and influenced the façade. By addressing these challenges with unique design solutions, the owner is able to offer tenants more layout options and the building boasts a more dynamic façade that brings new life to the streetscape. An open third floor pool and recreation deck provides dramatic views of the downtown area for all residents along with two interior courtyards featuring a fountain, vegetable garden, bocce court, and putting green.

South Central Indiana REMC

The goal of this project was to provide functionally efficient, flexible, and expandable areas within a facility that can be easily updated as workspace, technology, workflow processes, and number of employees change. The South Central Indiana Rural Electric Membership Corporation project includes a 50,000 square foot office, 37,000 square foot warehouse, basement, and community center that spreads over two stories.

The building was constructed with precast concrete walls, structural steel frame, and a metal roof. The design features include new LED lighting with sensors that provide more than 50% in energy savings, thick walls for better temperature and sound control, and restrooms equipped with sensor sinks, low-flow nozzles, low-flow toilets, and energy efficient hand dryers. In addition to the building features, there is a vehicle storage building that is approximately 18,000 square feet and a parking lot pre-wired for future electric car charging stations. Garmong provided construction services for the project.

The Langston

The Langston features 290 apartments in nine buildings and was the largest residential project built in Cleveland in over 30 years. With a prime location, the Langston captures the best student-focused amenities, providing easy access to campus, restaurants, shops, and nightlife. The Langston consists of multiple buildings for 1, 2, 3, and 4 bedroom apartments as well as retail and parking space.

The upscale, contemporary apartments are spacious, with open layouts and amenities such as modern kitchens with stainless steel and black appliances, walk-in closets, and private, attached bathrooms. Additionally, the apartment buildings have built-in study areas, an in-home laundry facility, private conference rooms, and a top-of-the-line fitness and training facility.

Building A is a four-story building with 10 units per floor and 40 total units. Building B is a four-story building with 14 housing units per floor for a total of 56 units. Building C is a five-story building with retail on the first floor and four stories of housing units above that are comprised of 11 units per floor for a total of 44 units. Buildings D, E, F, G, H, and I are four-story buildings with 25 housing units each.

Alpha

Named by the students of University of Alabama, this 696-bed, 263-unit student housing community offers fully furnished one, two, three, and four bedroom apartments. The project scope involved two sites located on the north and south sides of 13th Street East in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The buildings consist of a combination of 3-story (Type V) and 5 story (Type III) wood framed construction. The northern site includes a 3 level precast concrete parking structure and the southern site includes a single level cast-in-place concrete podium parking structure. The Alpha features a broad array of amenities including a 24-hour fitness center, leasing office, theater and gaming area, computer café, private study lounges, an expansive clubhouse, and garage parking. Outdoor amenities include a grilling area, fire pit, resort-style pool, and sundeck.

Lebanon Public Safety

CSO worked closely with representatives of the City of Lebanon, and the Lebanon Fire Department to design this new public safety building and fire station to serve the south side of Lebanon, Indiana.

The one-story, 17,133 square foot, 4-bay fire station can accommodate 12 fire fighters along with Emergency Medical Service staff and has 8 apparatus positions. The exterior is a very modern design that uses precast concrete and curtainwall as the primary materials. A large community room has also been provided for use by the public.

Park Hall

Park Hall was the first new residence hall on Ball State University’s campus since 1969.  Initially conceived as part of an area-specific master plan, Park Hall became the cornerstone of the redevelopment of the eastern residential quadrant of campus, which grew to include the renovation of adjacent housing and dining facilities.

The building houses 500 students, with a focus on double occupancy private units clustered around semi-private bathrooms. Amenity spaces include a multi-purpose room, classrooms, music practice rooms, and laundry facilities. Additional spaces including large 2-story student lounges and informal gathering spaces round out the living-learning experience.

As the first project on Ball State’s campus designed to receive LEED certification, a tremendous amount of planning went in to developing sustainable strategies which were not a detriment to the long-term maintenance of the building. Ultimately, the building achieved LEED Silver certification, exceeding the initial goals set for the project.