Lacy School of Business

The design features innovative spaces for experiential learning, including: flexible classrooms where local professionals teach workplace-style classes, centers staffed by organizations that involve students in research and outreach, and collaborative workspaces where students develop their own business in concert with experts from the region. The building represents Butler’s competitive distinction from its peer institutions by making activities and interaction immediately visible and central to students’ experience. The design provides visibility by creating transparent spaces that invite participation in central locations around the multi-story atrium at the heart of the building. In addition, the central, broad, open stairs and generous balconies encourage creative collisions as students, faculty, and visitors move and interact throughout the building.

The Innovation Commons, which opens onto the central atrium, is equipped for students to start and run their own businesses as well as a wide range of other types of experiential learning. The Centers, distributed around the main level, provide space where business professionals, faculty, and students work together to solve business challenges. Glass overhead doors open to connect to the atrium and convey the importance and vitality of that work to the school and its guests.

The Butler Business School is named in honor of Andre B. Lacy, a local, successful entrepreneur and philanthropist, as well as a committed family man and daring adventurer. CSO’s interior design studio honored his life with a series of installations that incorporate a collection of custom-designed icons representing his many facets. The icons appear throughout the building as design elements in areas such as the rug in the main atrium and small medallions that are hidden throughout the building. A timeline of his life takes the form of 25 envelopes, connecting his first job in a mailroom and the endowment gift, reminding students that their humble beginnings can build to something great. The design team also featured objects that were important to Lacy – the time clock Lacy once used to clock into his job and the motorcycle he rode across continents. These were both gifts from the family who were intimate collaborators on the project. The conference table in the board room adjacent to the Dean’s office features the Lacy family knot and is a duplication of a table that exists at Lacy’s corporate headquarters.

Located in a prominent place on the campus, visible from the east entrance, the building completes the cross axis of the original campus masterplan. The building’s vertical towers and active silhouette reflect the characteristics of the much-loved historic campus. The building replaces a parking lot and defines the intersection of the two major green spaces at the center of the campus. CSO completed this project in collaboration with Goody Clancy.

The Olivia on Main

The Olivia on Main Luxury Residence & Shoppes is a five-story, mixed use development that includes 204, 1 and 2 bedroom apartments, 17,000 square feet of retail/restaurant space on the ground floor, 57 covered parking spaces, an indoor amenities center, and an elevated second floor pool and deck with an indoor aqua lounge.

Upon arrival to the amenity center and leasing offices, visitors and residents are welcomed by an open concept with views to multiple engagement spaces. The design team planned the amenity center to allow residents and visitors to choose their level of social interaction within the space. On axis with the entry is a beautiful stone island and hospitality center. Intentionally located as the heart of the space, much like today’s residential kitchens, it serves as an informal gathering space, a hospitality space, and meeting location. From this central location residents and visitors may choose to further explore the space. Upon exploration, they will find a private movie room, fitness center, conference space, business center, gaming lounge, and finally a private library lounge.

The interior design of the apartment and amenity center sought to balance a luxury feel with a budget that was consistent with area development. Throughout the space touches of casual luxury are noted in unique lighting elements, natural stone materials, and a clever mix of metal finishes. The neutral foundation for the palette elevates these features allowing them to make a lasting impact on visitors and residents alike.

Forty540

Forty540, a speculative office building, was developed as Phase I of a two-building master-planned office park. The 5-story building includes expansive, interrupted floor plates of over 40,000 square feet, allowing for maximum flexibility and minimal disruption of interior space planning for large tenants while still maintaining common area efficiencies for small and mid-sized tenants. The building design includes high performance clear floor to ceiling glass to maximize visibility while minimizing solar heat gain within the building.

CSO’s interior designers worked with the owner to provide a lobby design that capitalizes on the concept of using the public area as an integrated community space. A social gathering lounge directly off the lobby provides space to meet, relax, and play. The finishes from the lobby stretch seamlessly into the lounge to create a connection and remove perceived barriers, thus breathing life into the lobby as well. A variety of seating options welcomes visitors and encourages them to utilize the space to meet their needs.

The architectural design reinterprets the classic base, middle, and top composition of commercial/public buildings in a more contemporary aesthetic. The exterior precast concrete skin uses three different colors and textures transcending from dark at the bottom to light at the top. The majority of the façade is composed of floor to ceiling punched windows, but incorporates sections of vertical precast panels and glass curtain wall to accent the main entrance and corners of the building.

Medical Office Building

CSO worked closely with the clinic’s administration to design a building that would provide a new home for the clinic, administrative areas, and a pharmacy.

The overall clinic layout is focused on limiting steps for the clinical staff while still maintaining a patient flow that is easily observed by staff. Treatment rooms allow patients to control lighting and audio/visual features while undergoing treatment. The design also successfully responds to check-in/check-out procedures, with a focus on efficient use of space. Administrative areas are predominately located on the second floor to provide a distinct separation between administrative and clinical staff. A communicating stair not only links the first and second floor, but it also serves as a sculptural element and, via overhead skylight, allows an abundance of natural light to penetrate into the interior of the first floor.

The exterior façade is a mixture of natural stone, masonry, and metal shingles with curtainwall accenting the large conference space on the second floor. An artistic glass tile feature wall extends from the façade to further enhance visual interest on the exterior. A sleek, modern employee break room opens up to a large outdoor dining/gathering terrace designed to accommodate a wide variety of staff functions.

310 at Nulu

310 at Nulu offers urban style studio apartments in the trendy East Market District of Louisville and allows for an easy commute to the University of Louisville.

The complex is comprised of two sites and three, 4-story buildings. The west site, located on the west side of Hancock Street, includes two, 4-story buildings with 139 units and 128 surface parking spaces. The east site, located on the east side of Hancock Street, has one, 4-story building with 27 parking spaces on the first level of the building.

The development features amenities such as a 24-hour media lounge and fitness center, an underground parking garage, controlled building access, on-site leasing office, and Energy Star certified appliances.

VisionLoft

VisionLoft responds to the growing tech culture and the need for event space in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. The building was built in 1908 as a livery with dirt floors, stables, and a shop-front. The property had undergone at least two conversions and had an uncertain past. The owners turned to CSO’s designers to guide them through a renovation to achieve a creative meeting hub in the city.

Exploratory demolition revealed brick walls and a wood ceiling consistent with the building’s age. Existing carpet was removed to expose a poured concrete floor most likely from the 1980’s. Two skylights and a fireplace were also repaired and are featured elements in the space.

The design team selected airy fixtures and furniture pieces to keep light moving through the space and introduced quirky tiles to keep the space modern and lighthearted. The industrial shell is juxtaposed against a moss wall and custom-made planter wall to give the back door privacy but allow light to filter in from both ends of the building. The space features all wireless technology, an interactive touch video wall, dual screen projectors, and more.

CSO’s collaboration with the owners resulted in a truly unique space in downtown Indianapolis for interactive meetings, ideation sessions, weddings, and more. The owners worked with Purposeful Design to design and fabricate the custom planter wall. Purposeful Design is a local not-for-profit whose mission is to help rebuild lives of individuals broken by addiction or homelessness, equip them with valuable work skills, and provide the gift of work training.

Mark Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology

Housed on the main level of the west side of Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall, the Cuban Center provides Media School students with work opportunities, internships, and instruction in the use of advanced sports media technology. Students produce high-quality professional content for IU Athletics, including live event broadcasts for all 24 IU sports, virtual reality videos for fan experience, athlete instruction, recruiting videos and social media, video board displays, and team specific shows.

The spaces that make up the Cuban Center include a virtual reality TV studio, video editing room, sound editing room, conference room, photography studio, media storage room, and offices for the Indiana University Sports Media Department. Court-level renovations were necessary to accommodate a supporting control room and server room.

The Center is designed to be very modern, open, visible, and collaborative while still maintaining sound control by utilizing sound-resistant glass walls to separate spaces.

Roche Diagnostics Lab and Office

The objective for this 55,569 square foot, 2-story building addition was to bring together five related product testing laboratories into one unified setting for increased productivity and effectiveness. In order to address workflow requirements, the design is sited as an addition to an existing building but it is essentially a freestanding two-story structure. The program included product testing labs, various purpose-designed meeting spaces, social hub/interaction spaces, and a variety of flexible, concentrative and mobile work settings.

The program areas were layered vertically in the building to manage biohazard separations and controls, with the lab spaces on the first floor and the flexible work environments, meeting, and interaction areas located on the second floor for access to natural light. In order to promote interaction and a sense of community, the most public function – the social hub – is located adjacent to the main staircase, at the most centralized point in the circulation atrium. This convergence of circulation and social functions has proven to be very conducive to staff interaction.

In order to maximize natural light while adhering to sustainable design features, detailed 3-D models, sun path studies, building sections, and energy analysis models were developed and analyzed to inform the final design configuration of the west façade shading system and glazing. The design solution creates a carefully designed, glazed west-facing façade which allows very controlled, diffused natural daylight directly into the circulation atrium and deeply into the lab, office, and interaction spaces beyond.

The interior spaces were designed with extensive interior glazing to display the advanced laboratory technology and innovation that is central to Roche’s business success and corporate culture, as well as to allow for the deep penetration of natural light. The Design Team combined very clean, European modernist materials and furnishings with a warm palette of neutral hues and accent colors rooted in the native Indiana landscape.

As the result of the client’s tech-based culture and high design aspirations, the design team employed a rigorous, multidisciplinary, sustainable design approach to create an uplifting, technologically advanced facility that inspires its scientific staff and expresses its culture of scientific innovation.

The Langston

The Langston features over 370 apartments in nine buildings and was the largest residential project built in Cleveland in over 30 years. With a prime location, the Langston captures the best student-focused amenities, providing easy access to campus, restaurants, shops, and nightlife. The Langston consists of multiple buildings for 1,2,3, and 4 bedroom apartments as well as retail and parking space.

The upscale, contemporary apartments are spacious, with open layouts and amenities such as modern kitchens with stainless steel and black appliances, walk-in closets, and private, attached bathrooms. Additionally, the apartment buildings have built-in study areas, an in-home laundry facility, private conference rooms, and a top-of-the-line fitness and training facility.

Building A is a four-story building with 10 units per floor and 40 total units. Building B is a four-story building with 14 housing units per floor for a total of 56 units. Building C is a five-story building with retail on the first floor and four stories of housing units above that are comprised of 11 units per floor for a total of 44 units. Buildings D, E, F, G, H, and I are four-story buildings with 25 housing units each.

Lebanon Public Safety

CSO worked closely with representatives of the City of Lebanon, and the Lebanon Fire Department to design this new public safety building and fire station to serve the south side of Lebanon, Indiana.

The one-story, 17,133 square foot, 4-bay fire station can accommodate 12 fire fighters along with Emergency Medical Service staff and has 8 apparatus positions. The exterior is a very modern design that uses precast concrete and curtainwall as the primary materials. A large community room has also been provided for use by the public.