IBJ Media Corporate Headquarters

After nearly 40 years in the same office, IBJ Media had the opportunity to move to a historic building overlooking the iconic Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. CSO designed a space that features unique branding elements referencing the history of the printing industry while giving IBJ’s workplace a fresh new look.

Cursed with low ceilings and odd angles, the space presented challenges for space planning and capturing natural light. CSO’s interiors team focused on the positive – great views of Monument Circle and raw building materials that told the story of the building’s past. The designers embraced the odd building shape as an opportunity to carve out interesting spaces.

Upon entering the IBJ’s new offices, visitors are greeted by a custom art installation created from rolled up pieces of the IBJ’s past publications. Working closely with CSO, the artist took great care to highlight quirky references to Indiana, setting a sophisticated-but-fun tone from the very beginning. To the right, the reception desk sits in front of a black-on-black logo, representing raised printing press letters covered in black ink, a reference to the history of the profession.

Other creative decisions were guided by the mostly-linear layout of a newspaper and by the idea of the old meeting the new. As we sit at a crossroads between digital and printed news consumption, this new office tells a beautiful story of those things working in harmony with each other both in function and aesthetic.

Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine

Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine is a leading neurological healthcare provider. With a presence at major health institutions throughout the Indianapolis area, their newest office is their first stand-alone location. Seeing this as an opportunity to express their trusted brand through the use of space, they tapped long-time partner, CSO, for the job.

Upon entering the building, staff and clients are greeted with a 2-story dimensional wall and unique light sculpture, directly contrasting with an otherwise sleek and minimal lobby. It is immediately clear that this space is not a typical healthcare environment. Continuing into the first floor patient area, patients see a materiality not often associated with healthcare: diffused light art installations, clean white quartz, and black metal accents are paired with a textured carpet and wood accents to create a space that, despite its modernity, is warm and welcoming to all.

The exam area is laid out in an easy-to-navigate circular traffic pattern. As patients enter this area, they first see the checkout desk and its identifying feature: a stunning image of brain neurons which has been enlarged so much that the look could be mistaken for marble.

Upstairs, the reception area also sports a unique and beautiful installation. This time, a wood-and metal sculpture grabs your attention. It undulates against the wall, conjuring a spinal cord. Across the waiting room, patients can catch a glimpse of a companion piece: a spine-like light fixture hanging above a staff-only conference space.

Staff spaces are designed to the same standard as the patient-facing spaces. A social hub on each floor contains upscale casework and the warmth of a wood ceiling. The second floor social hub includes a dramatic upholstered bench. Both spaces provide respite from the staff’s naturally stressful jobs.  Throughout, CSO’s interiors team focused on creating a space that felt curated and filled with art, similar to how staff and patients might curate their own art collections at home. By making a space that feels both forward-thinking and welcoming, CSO’s interiors team was able to express Goodman Campbell’s own approach to healthcare.

Gateway Hancock Health

CSO conducted extensive visioning sessions with administrators, doctors, nurses, community members, and others in order to capture the spirit of Hancock Regional Health (HRH) and the people who would use this new campus. It was very apparent that the residents were in need of community-gathering place that would provide options for walking and biking along with spaces to hold meetings and events.

Phase I of the project is the Gateway Clinic, which provides urgent care, imaging services, and a lab. Using the data gathered during the visioning sessions, the design team developed a concept for a single waiting room to support all services, with views of the existing forest on the property. The waiting area breaks the healthcare mold and offers café and lounge seating, encouraging patients to work or play while waiting for their appointments.

The idea for this café-lounge waiting area became the backbone of the design and drove the architecture from the inside out. Working closely together, interior designers and architects were able to create a building that prioritized the needs of the community, patients, and employees without sacrificing efficiency or design aesthetic.

JW Marriott

The 34-story crescent-shaped tower fronts the city but pivots on the site, reinforcing the downtown grid to the east while acknowledging the museum campus gardens and White River to the west and north. The complex has a low-rise masonry and limestone podium that wraps the west and south façades and creates a city-scaled plinth that helps moderate the overall scale of the structure. The dramatic tower interlocks with the podium and presents itself in full height along the east and north façades, and a two-story glass canopy defines the main entrance on West Street.

Within the podium there is ballroom and meeting space made up of 23,000 square feet of exhibition space, a 20,670 square foot junior ballroom and a 40,500 square foot grand ballroom, which is one of the largest Marriott ballrooms in the world.  The 1,005-key complex also has a 1,000 car, three-level, below grade parking structure and a covered overhead walkway to the Indiana Convention Center, making it the perfect destination for the adjacent convention center, museums, ballpark, and business district. This project was completed in collaboration with HOK and was the largest JW in the world at the time of completion.

The Taft Center

The Taft Center, located in the Regions Tower in downtown Indianapolis, was conceptualized by the law firm to achieve multiple goals: to establish a ground floor presence within one of the most well-known buildings downtown, to provide a venue to entertain and host, and finally, to expand the conference spaces currently located on floors 31-35 to meet a growing need. To achieve these goals, Taft partnered with the CSO Interior Design Studio.

Designers incorporated simple forms with classic material choices, balanced by distinctive design features. These elements, coupled with the playful constellation of lights and identifiable repetition of the signature Taft forward slash, create a space that is fresh and exclusive in the legal profession.

Understanding the sensitivities of the business that Taft conducts, and their desire to maximize the glass within the conference rooms, the design team worked closely with CSO’s acoustician to design an all glass system that maximizes acoustic benefits. This resulted in nearly uninterrupted walls of glass, which terminate at a back-printed glass panel that features downtown’s iconic Monument Circle.

The café space, which is strategically located to incorporate a street-front presence, offers an inviting urban feel with a natural palette.

Hampton Inn & Suites – Rosemont

The 5-story, 158 key hotel is a shared site with a parking garage and office building. Upon arrival guests walk into an intimate atmosphere created by the use of harmonious cool colors, soft contrasting patterns, and delicate lighting. The lobby is designed as an extension of the common area which includes a breakfast and bar area that incorporates a variety of seating and lighting options for both leisure and business travelers. Additionally, a floor-to-ceiling fireplace wall provides a subtle divide between the lobby and common seating area as well as encourages a free flow of movement. Interior spaces are infused with local photography and artwork and the sleek modern aesthetic creates a feeling of elegance. Natural materials include brick, limestone, wood, and glass.

Hotel features include support spaces, a business center, a full-service bar, heated indoor swimming pool and fitness center, a food and beverage shop, and two 273 square foot meeting spaces that can accommodate up to 20 people.

310 at Nulu

310 at Nulu offers urban style studio apartments in the trendy East Market District of Louisville and allows for an easy commute to the University of Louisville.

The complex is comprised of two sites and three, 4-story buildings. The west site, located on the west side of Hancock Street, includes two, 4-story buildings with 139 units and 128 surface parking spaces. The east site, located on the east side of Hancock Street, has one, 4-story building with 27 parking spaces on the first level of the building.

The development features amenities such as a 24-hour media lounge and fitness center, an underground parking garage, controlled building access, on-site leasing office, and Energy Star certified appliances.

The Depot at Nickel Plate

The Depot at Nickel Plate provides an upscale blend of residential and retail space in a pedestrian friendly mixed-use development that helped launch the revitalization of downtown Fishers.

The lower level of the mixed-use development consists of approximately 17,000 square feet of retail, dining, and entertainment space as well as a 430-space cast-in-place parking garage. The Depot at Nickel Plate amenities includes two exterior courtyards, a fitness center, pool, leasing office, and community lounge areas.

Conveniently located just blocks from parks, trails, and Interstate 69, The Depot at Nickel Plate is the prime location for anyone looking to enjoy all that Fishers has to offer. Each apartment is equipped with stainless steel EnergyStar appliances, granite countertops, oversized soaking tubs, energy efficient lighting, and wood style flooring.

The Commons

Through a long series of meetings and public planning sessions, resulting in the review of over 5000 survey responses, the City and the building owners decided to demolish the original building and rebuild on the same site. Input revealed the following priorities for the new design.

      • Creating a new and improved performance space
      • Expanding and improving the indoor playground
      • Adding more informal and formal public meeting spaces
      • Including more food and restaurant opportunities
      • Maintaining the sculpture, “Chaos 1,” by Jean Tinguely, which was a highlight of the development’s original interior

The new Commons provides public meeting and performance areas, a playground, restaurants, and a commons area in the center.

Early in the design process, prior to demolition, it was determined that the new facility would pay tribute to the original by keeping the steel superstructure of the original building as well as leaving the beloved sculpture, Chaos 1, exactly where it has always stood. Consequently, demolition was very selective.

The newly created main entrance to the building features zigzag windows that are acoustical as well as architectural, framing views down the main street. Escalators and stairs wrap around the Chaos 1 sculpture, in its original location, to create a commons space and draw people to the second floor activities.

A new second floor under the original building’s structure provides space for the multi-purpose performance and activity space. The upper level space is designed for flexibility to accommodate public community events, performances, and private events.

A corner glass pavilion is skewed and sloped, providing views of the corner courthouse tower while creating an intriguing space to house a new indoor playground featuring a custom designed interactive sculpture that serves as a “climber” for children.

Natural daylighting, energy efficient lighting and mechanical system, and a vegetated green roof on the new structure assist with making this a sustainable project.

CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim to complete this project.

American Red Cross Indiana Region Headquarters

Through collaboration and funding with the City of Indianapolis, and donor support, Red Cross was able to achieve their goal of building a new, more efficient headquarters. The new building’s reduced footprint and efficient use of space allows the American Red Cross (ARC) to commit more dollars to what they do best: always being there in times of need. Flexible training rooms, a community center, teaming areas, local office spaces, and huddle spaces encapsulate the programs within the headquarters, creating an environment that promotes interaction where employees and volunteers feel energized and accommodated. Employees are not assigned desks or specific work spaces so the design of the facility is very flexible and adaptable. Amenities include a rooftop terrace that creates a respite and wellness destination, and a coffee house that connects and creates community.

The building is extremely sustainable, with the exterior wrapped in red brick, seamlessly blending in with the surrounding architectural aesthetic. The headquarters has large windows that welcome natural light creating a community-oriented atmosphere and providing views of the surrounding neighborhood of downtown Indianapolis. In addition, a key branding focal point is incorporated on the interior corridor that displays historical Red Cross artifacts, local to Indianapolis. The iconic, ARC-branded “red” is carried throughout the headquarters. The American Red Cross new Indiana Regional Headquarters is the first Red Cross facility to reflect new design standards developed for the organization by Perkins + Will.
Photography: © James Steinkamp

SpringHill Suites – Bloomington

Located in the heart of Bloomington, SpringHill Suites is just a few minutes away from Indiana University’s main campus, Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall, and shopping and dining on Kirkwood Avenue. The hotel is a 5-level modified prototype SpringHill Suites that occupies 0.83 acres, has 158-keys, and two levels of underground parking with 133 spaces.

Every aspect, from furniture and lighting to colors and fabrics, has been carefully selected to offer calm and refreshing spaces. Separate living, working, and sleeping spaces also provide guests with flexibility and functionality.

Features of the hotel include a custom lobby bar with fireplace and lounge areas, an indoor pool, 24-hour fitness center, business center, and laundry facility. The hotel suites are 25% larger/more spacious than traditional guests rooms within other hotels in downtown Bloomington in order to better accommodate families visiting campus. Each hotel room is equipped with a desk, pull-out sofa, local art, and views of downtown Bloomington.

GE Aviation LEAP Engine Facility

The GE Aviation LEAP Engine Facility is the second of its kind in the United States and the third project of this type CSO has designed for GE. The facility features some of the most advanced manufacturing techniques in the world and represents a major milestone in technology development in this country.

The 35’ clear height manufacturing space included 80’ structural spans with 12.5 ton beam cranes, 10” thick, ultra-flat, polished concrete floors and generous amounts of natural light provided by expansive clerestory windows. The tiered ceiling panels within the assembly space help humanize the scale. They serve as a space transition and a subtle representation of flight. The finishes are intentionally light, clean, and neutral. This notion relates directly to the GE brand and the idea of intentional design without compromise.

The office/administrative portion of the building was designed to express the aerodynamic curvature and the composite construction techniques of the LEAP engine, most notably its fan blade, by dramatically incorporating several overlapping layers of sinuously curved metal, glass, and steel.

The interior design reinforces the intentional nature of the engine while embracing the technology. The central greeting point is a reception desk designed as a seamless, clean cone and constructed of solid surface. Beautifully crafted metal composite triangles are suspended above the reception desk representing the combustion technology present within the LEAP engine. In addition, this sculptural element contributes to the notion of movement so dominantly present within the architecture.

Artistry

The Artistry project revitalizes an area of downtown Indianapolis that had seemingly been forgotten. Phase 1 of the project provides an adaptive reuse solution to the former Bank One Operations Center structure by converting it to a 362,000 square foot mixed-use development, including four stories of apartments and amenity spaces over parking, office, and retail space at grade. This LEED for Homes Silver certified project defines a new gateway into the city and has served as a catalyst for development within the newly defined “Market East Cultural District. Phase 1 is considered to be the main building within a four-building mixed use development. The goals for Phase 1 were to design a building that would:

      • Serve as a gateway and catalyst for the revitalization of the Market East Cultural District.
      • Create a vibrant mixed-use development through the adaptive reuse of the former Bank One Operations Center.
      • Emphasize an urban industrial aesthetic through the physical reuse of the existing building structure.
      • Promote an urban apartment community that is enhanced by its dynamic outdoor living environment.

CSO went on to design Phase 2 of the project, which involved the addition of two buildings, the Mentor and Muse at Artistry, which provide additional living options to fit different types of lifestyles, including 354 square foot eco-suites for those who need minimal space.

Phase I of the project was particularly challenging due to the owner’s intent to build up from an existing structure. The configuration of the existing structure required that designers incorporate a number of potentially awkward column locations. Ultimately, this became a feature of the building design as the column placement dictated a wide array of residential unit variations and influenced the façade. By addressing these challenges with unique design solutions, the owner is able to offer tenants more layout options and the building boasts a more dynamic façade that brings new life to the streetscape. An open third floor pool and recreation deck provides dramatic views of the downtown area for all residents along with two interior courtyards featuring a fountain, vegetable garden, bocce court, and putting green.

Regal Beloit

Wisconsin-based Regal Beloit Corporation is a leading manufacturer of electric motors, electrical motion controls, power generation, and power transmission products serving markets throughout the world. Regal Beloit decided that it needed another distribution center along with the main one in Indianapolis, and this location was the right fit to service the western half of the United States.

CSO designed a new facility to house heavy industrial goods used to make metal components for HVAC and refrigerator applications, and to provide logistics support to Regal’s manufacturing plants across the border in Mexico. The facility is expandable to 300,000 square feet and was completed in less than a year.

Fairfield Inn & Suites

CSO was commissioned by White Lodging Services to design a new, five-story hotel adjacent to the University of Notre Dame campus.  Located within walking distance of the football stadium, the Marriott Fairfield Inn & Suites is a 119-key, custom designed hotel.  The exterior building design incorporates brick and stone masonry to compliment nearby retail and commercial development.  The interior design of the hotel, featuring the Notre Dame Fighting Irish’s blue and gold, celebrates the University’s long-standing traditions.  The hotel amenities include a fitness center, indoor pool, two meeting/event rooms, business center, and dining area. In addition, the hotel has spacious, contemporary rooms and suites equipped with work desks and ergonomic chairs.  Construction for the new hotel was completed two months early.

The Avenue

The design for the Avenue includes three structures on one site. The main building parallels 10th Street and includes 21,000 square feet of retail space on the first floor.

Apartment amenities and community features include modern apartments fully equipped with black, stainless-steel appliances, walk-in closets and spacious patios and balconies; a fitness center; a saltwater swimming pool with an outdoor kitchen and grill; Internet café, media room, and business center with several study areas.

This 4-story, 76 unit, wood frame apartment building has a concrete and steel podium structure constructed between two buildings. The second building is a 4-story, 48 unit, wood frame apartment building with slab on grade construction. The third building is a 4-story wood frame building consisting of approximately 3,500 square feet of amenity space on the first floor and 6 units (3 flats, 3 townhomes) constructed within the three stories above the amenity space. Additionally, the Avenue has a 3-story, 260 space, on-site parking garage.

Cummins Office Building

The building design focuses on sustainable features, including a highly detailed southern exposure curtain wall.  The articulated glass curtain wall features floor to ceiling windows which provides day-lighting and exterior views throughout.

Primarily planned for an open office workplace with internal offices, the upper floors have a central building core.  Glass enclosed conference rooms are located on the southeast and southwest corners with great views of the downtown square.  A flexible employee dining and conference center are located on the first floor southeast corner, with direct access to the adjacent Commons food court.

The primary emphasis for the open office workplace is natural light and expansive views out.  The southern façade daylighting is controlled with louvered sunscreen shading, shades, and photocell controlled perimeter lighting.  The western windows are shaded with vertical sun fins and occasional translucent glass.  The clear glass is insulated with low-e coating.  Energy-efficient lighting and mechanical systems were critical for lower operating costs.

Three years after the initial building was completed, a five-story addition was built adjacent to the existing building. The exterior façades were designed with varying heights in order to allow for a four-story atrium that joins the two buildings and a three-story front on the north side of the building to match the adjacent Commons building. The fourth floor of the addition features a corner terrace and a vegetated green roof. CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim Architects and Associates to design the original building and the addition.

GE Aviation Components Manufacturing Facility

The CSO-designed expansion of this facility, including equipment, represents a $50 million investment to modernize and grow GE Aviation’s existing Hooksett manufacturing facility. The facility, with nearly 900 employees, manufactures rotating parts for GE’s military and commercial jet engines. The expansion will significantly increase manufacturing output and technological capacity for key components of GE’s next-generation LEAP engines.

This was the fourth large-scale project CSO has partnered with GE Aviation on, including two plants in Mississippi, $100 million LEAP assembly plant in Lafayette, Indiana, and a $120 million Brilliant Factory in Welland, Ontario, Canada.

Joshi Performance Hall

From the onset of this performance hall project, the design team was challenged to think outside of the box to craft a solution that would meet the demanding requirements of the Ernestine M. Raclin School of Music students and faculty within a very tight budget and time frame. The conversion of an existing lecture hall and its adjacent spaces into a state-of-the-art recital hall is the culmination of the Joshi family’s vision to provide young musicians and singers excellent educational and career development opportunities at IUSB. Indiana University turned to CSO for their performing arts expertise after the original design team was unable to provide a solution within budget. CSO’s design incorporates an electronic architectural sound system that provides optimal acoustical characteristics within the confines of the existing space without major, costly physical modifications.

Each element of the design supplements the integrated sound system, in order to achieve a harmonious balance of sound and “sparkle”. The formerly carpeted walls are now clad in rich wood paneling and acoustic diffusion systems which add physical and acoustical warmth to the space. Deep red tapestry has been integrated into the side walls to add an air of sophistication to the space. All of the elements work together and create an experience for every patron, allowing them to be completely enveloped by the art being performed on stage. The performance hall provides a world class venue for chamber music, soloist, and small ensemble performances in addition to providing the use of state-of-the-art recording equipment for students and faculty.

Allstate

At more than 70,000 square feet, the new Allstate office building houses multiple departments across the three levels of the building. The building design presents vertical precast concrete fins and deep horizontal curtainwall mullions which provide depth in the façade.  The entries are accentuated by a metal panel feature wall floating off of the main façade of the building as well as blue accents on the entry canopy and curtainwall system above.  A centralized, ornamental open staircase links all three floors to the sophisticated, terrazzo lobby in addition to providing natural light to the lower levels core areas via a skylight above.

Included in the design are lobby, reception, and security spaces; office and open office work space; conference and support space; a large break room; and a kitchenette. The office and open office work space was designed to be flexible and adaptable to enhance a collaborative environment and allow the expansion of current and future departments housed within.

Governor Mitch Daniels Barracks Complex

CSO was retained by the Military Department of Indiana for the design of one of two new complexes for Camp Atterbury. The facility provides barracks for over 600 soldiers in standard modified two-story design. The project was designed in accordance with the requirements of UFC 4-171-05 Army Reserve Facilities, 4-010-01 anti-terrorism force protection.

The project includes billeting facilities in a barracks-style configuration, as well as 2+2 sleeping quarters for the non-commissioned officers associated with each wing. A television lounge, internet café, laundry, and latrine facilities are provided with each set of barracks. Two Bachelor Officer Quarters house 80 soldiers in a semi-private 2+2 arrangement.

A 30,000 square foot dining facility serving the complex is also included. The project is the first phase of a new complex just north of the existing Camp Atterbury campus that will house 6,000 soldiers.

Dallara IndyCar Factory

Dallara’s values of service, commitment, and excellence in engineering and the motorsport tradition in Indianapolis provided the catalyst for their decision to locate their American headquarters and engineering center in Speedway, Indiana, just a short distance from the legendary Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The building also serves as the headquarters for the Indy Racing Experience, which provides race-related experiences for fans and car enthusiasts in multiple venues and is the sole North American distributor for Dallara.

The building design features an architectural form that was derived from the aerodynamic shape of the Dallara chassis. Exterior materials were selected to reestablish the historical palette of the original downtown Speedway. The eye catching glass front of the building faces the town’s Main Street and houses an interactive fan experience area with a rotating display of cars, offering transparency that allows the public views of the Dallara design process and finished product.

Dallara’s production area includes space for fabrication, machine, and bodywork. Each of these areas have the potential of providing services for projects other than IndyCar and, therefore, it was important that they be kept separate from public areas and from the Indy Racing Experience spaces. The structural grid and bays were designed to provide maximum flexibility in the production area.

St. Thomas Medical Center

The Jasper Medical Office Building includes a four-operating room ambulatory surgery center, an imaging suite, exam rooms, and facilities for the nearby Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center just south of the project site.

In keeping with the goals for the project, the building is LEED Certified for Core and Shell. CSO’s design included tenant guidelines for tenants to design and build towards LEED certification.

Sustainability and energy savings, resulting in LEED certification, were achieved through a number of initiatives, including but not limited to sustainable site development, solar orientation, integrating solar shading devices, increasing thermal insulation in the walls and roof, using high-efficiency glazing types, reducing overhead lighting levels where applicable, using low VOC materials, and by using materials extracted & manufactured within a 500-mile radius of the site.

The first level includes Memorial Hospital’s Outpatient Surgery Center and Outpatient MRI Suite as well as medical offices. The second level consists of medical office space, on-site physical therapy including aquatic therapy, and a chapel. A blend of brick, glass, and metal composite material panels, the building’s design is a modern twist on the nearby Memorial Hospital building.

Zionsville Fire Station #93

Station No. 93 features a four-bay drive-thru apparatus room, fire engine, ambulance, training room, and living area for up to 12 personnel with room for future growth.

It was Zionsville Fire Department’s goal that the building be designed for a fifty-year life span, be flexible in layout to accommodate change over time, be economical to maintain and operate, and have a scale that reflected the residential developments in the surrounding community.

Interior flexibility was achieved by using a steel frame through the center of the residence which allows the entire facility to be reconfigured, within the perimeter walls, without disrupting the structural integrity of the building. The finished design is a result of a carefully managed balance between cost, quality, and scope with the end result achieving the overall project goals and reflecting the values of the Zionsville Fire Department and Town of Zionsville.

The Langston

The Langston features over 370 apartments in nine buildings and was the largest residential project built in Cleveland in over 30 years. With a prime location, the Langston captures the best student-focused amenities, providing easy access to campus, restaurants, shops, and nightlife. The Langston consists of multiple buildings for 1,2,3, and 4 bedroom apartments as well as retail and parking space.

The upscale, contemporary apartments are spacious, with open layouts and amenities such as modern kitchens with stainless steel and black appliances, walk-in closets, and private, attached bathrooms. Additionally, the apartment buildings have built-in study areas, an in-home laundry facility, private conference rooms, and a top-of-the-line fitness and training facility.

Building A is a four-story building with 10 units per floor and 40 total units. Building B is a four-story building with 14 housing units per floor for a total of 56 units. Building C is a five-story building with retail on the first floor and four stories of housing units above that are comprised of 11 units per floor for a total of 44 units. Buildings D, E, F, G, H, and I are four-story buildings with 25 housing units each.

Alpha

Named by the students of University of Alabama, this 698-bed, 266-unit student housing community offers fully furnished one, two, three, and four bedroom apartments. The project scope involved two sites located on the north and south sides of 13th Street East in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The buildings consist of a combination of 3-story (Type V) and 5 story (Type III) wood framed construction. The northern site includes a 3 level precast concrete parking structure and the southern site includes a single level cast-in-place concrete podium parking structure. The Alpha features a broad array of amenities including a 24-hour fitness center, leasing office, theater and gaming area, computer café, private study lounges, an expansive clubhouse, and garage parking. Outdoor amenities include a grilling area, fire pit, resort-style pool, and sundeck.

ASI Limited

ASI Limited, an Indianapolis-based supplier, fabricator, and installer of architectural window and specialty systems, needed a new corporate headquarters after outgrowing their prior office, which was also designed by CSO.

ASI takes responsibility for enclosing a building’s exterior, including curtain walls, windows, metal panels, doors, and ornamental metals so the design needed to reflect the company’s progressive, forward-thinking corporate philosophy.

The building features 20,000 square feet of office space defined by a curtainwall at the corner of the building. The design incorporates Kalzip perforated screens that are attached using a specially designed grid system and concealed fasteners to anchor it to the curtain wall. The client was intrigued by the fact that, during the day, the screen was very visible as a design element but at night the screen took on a whole different appearance. In addition to providing a design element, the screen provided a shield from the afternoon sun on the southwest side of the building.

St. Francis Projects

St. Francis Medical Office Building I

Total Square Footage: 100,000

The four-story building is connected to the St. Francis Hospital South Campus by an enclosed walkway at ground level. Office space is leased to a variety of medical practices, including the St. Francis Hospital Physical Therapy Clinic.

 

St. Francis Medical Office Building II

Total Square Footage: 144,415

A four-story medical office building was designed for speculative tenants. The exterior of the building was developed to be compatible with the original medical office building. The exterior materials are architectural precast and aluminum store front.

 

St. Francis Medical Office Building Plainfield

Total Square Footage: 22,077

The Plainfield location was designed for both St. Francis physicians and speculative tenants. The project establishes a neighborhood presence for St. Francis and, as such, was designed to harmonize with the residential neighborhood and create a buffer from the commercial corridor.

 

St. Francis Medical Office Building U.S. 31 & Southport Rd.

Total Square Footage: 20,000

This location accommodates both St. Francis physicians and speculative medical tenants. The building occupies a prominent site at the intersection of U.S. 31 and Southport Rd. and is the first two-story variation on the architectural themes common to other St. Francis Health Centers.

 

St. Francis Medical Office Building Franklin & Southport Rd.

Total Square Footage: 22,000

Like other St. Francis Health Centers, this building utilizes a smaller massing and residential forms to harmonize with the neighborhood context.