Tri-North Middle School

Monroe County Community School Corporation (MCCSC) identified the need to replace the aging Tri-North Middle School. CSO and BrainSpaces, an expert in brain-based educational planning and design, led a visioning and programming process that enabled CSO to design a new building tailored to the specific needs and vision of Tri-North students, teachers, and administrators.

The building layout utilizes next generation learning elements including an open media center, collaboration spaces, and small group rooms throughout the building. Teachers and administrators expressed the need for spaces to be flexible and adaptable to a rapidly changing educational world. CSO’s design addresses the need for flexibility by implementing features such as the use of operable theater seating in the Performance / Large Group Instruction space, operable partitions in Science and STEM labs, and spaces that are planned to facilitate the use of both departmental and interdisciplinary teaching models.

MCCSC also emphasized the need for sustainable design considerations which were implemented with plans for a geothermal system, solar array on the gym roof, and use of local materials and native plants. The leadership of MCCSC is excited for the New Tri-North Middle School to be the crown jewel for this Bloomington community.

Health Sciences Building

Part of the University’s efforts to economically revive the south side neighborhood and attract new students, the Health Sciences building provides a new gateway to campus and an integrated hub where faculty, students, and healthcare professionals can collaborate on education and research.

The new Health Sciences building is reflective of the University’s commitment to inspiring excellence by providing learning opportunities that respond in innovative ways to the needs of all students. The building design presents a transparent, flexible concept that allows for current and future needs of the programs housed within. The building’s prominent location creates an ideal venue for an outdoor seating and interaction area adjacent to the indoor café.

The building consolidates several departments into a collaborative and integrated learning environment that promotes intellectual and social interaction among students and faculty. Included in the design are teaching spaces, faculty areas, research labs, and wellness-related areas for the Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Nursing, Kinesiology, and Psychology Programs.

Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall

When Indiana University set out to improve the iconic Assembly Hall, they prioritized the preservation of the original aesthetic while challenging the design team to develop a bold, yet respectful expansion that closely aligned with the architectural character of the original structure. Contextual influences drove a design solution that integrated the new addition into the existing structure holistically with a reverent architectural expression that closely relates to the original.

A new atrium space allows views between the entry and main concourse. This is the center of the new space and features a reinvented version of Athlete’s Hall and a panoramic window allowing views into the arena. The new arrival area supports existing traditions while offering a space for new traditions, events, and ceremonies to take place. The new entry is conveniently located, and visible escalators create a clear and efficient means for moving spectators through the space into the arena. A new Box Seat Club offers an exceptional viewing experience of events. CSO collaborated with SmithGroup to complete this project.

CSO subsequently completed the Roberts Family Indiana Basketball Team Center and Mark Cuban Center for Sports Technology located within Assembly Hall.

The Commons

Through a long series of meetings and public planning sessions, resulting in the review of over 5000 survey responses, the City and the building owners decided to demolish the original building and rebuild on the same site. Input revealed the following priorities for the new design.

      • Creating a new and improved performance space
      • Expanding and improving the indoor playground
      • Adding more informal and formal public meeting spaces
      • Including more food and restaurant opportunities
      • Maintaining the sculpture, “Chaos 1,” by Jean Tinguely, which was a highlight of the development’s original interior

The new Commons provides public meeting and performance areas, a playground, restaurants, and a commons area in the center.

Early in the design process, prior to demolition, it was determined that the new facility would pay tribute to the original by keeping the steel superstructure of the original building as well as leaving the beloved sculpture, Chaos 1, exactly where it has always stood. Consequently, demolition was very selective.

The newly created main entrance to the building features zigzag windows that are acoustical as well as architectural, framing views down the main street. Escalators and stairs wrap around the Chaos 1 sculpture, in its original location, to create a commons space and draw people to the second floor activities.

A new second floor under the original building’s structure provides space for the multi-purpose performance and activity space. The upper level space is designed for flexibility to accommodate public community events, performances, and private events.

A corner glass pavilion is skewed and sloped, providing views of the corner courthouse tower while creating an intriguing space to house a new indoor playground featuring a custom designed interactive sculpture that serves as a “climber” for children.

Natural daylighting, energy efficient lighting and mechanical system, and a vegetated green roof on the new structure assist with making this a sustainable project.

CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim to complete this project.

American Red Cross Indiana Region Headquarters

Through collaboration and funding with the City of Indianapolis, and donor support, Red Cross was able to achieve their goal of building a new, more efficient headquarters. The new building’s reduced footprint and efficient use of space allows the American Red Cross (ARC) to commit more dollars to what they do best: always being there in times of need. Flexible training rooms, a community center, teaming areas, local office spaces, and huddle spaces encapsulate the programs within the headquarters, creating an environment that promotes interaction where employees and volunteers feel energized and accommodated. Employees are not assigned desks or specific work spaces so the design of the facility is very flexible and adaptable. Amenities include a rooftop terrace that creates a respite and wellness destination, and a coffee house that connects and creates community.

The building is extremely sustainable, with the exterior wrapped in red brick, seamlessly blending in with the surrounding architectural aesthetic. The headquarters has large windows that welcome natural light creating a community-oriented atmosphere and providing views of the surrounding neighborhood of downtown Indianapolis. In addition, a key branding focal point is incorporated on the interior corridor that displays historical Red Cross artifacts, local to Indianapolis. The iconic, ARC-branded “red” is carried throughout the headquarters. The American Red Cross new Indiana Regional Headquarters is the first Red Cross facility to reflect new design standards developed for the organization by Perkins + Will.
Photography: © James Steinkamp

Roche Diagnostics Lab and Office

The objective for this 55,569 square foot, 2-story building addition was to bring together five related product testing laboratories into one unified setting for increased productivity and effectiveness. In order to address workflow requirements, the design is sited as an addition to an existing building but it is essentially a freestanding two-story structure. The program included product testing labs, various purpose-designed meeting spaces, social hub/interaction spaces, and a variety of flexible, concentrative and mobile work settings.

The program areas were layered vertically in the building to manage biohazard separations and controls, with the lab spaces on the first floor and the flexible work environments, meeting, and interaction areas located on the second floor for access to natural light. In order to promote interaction and a sense of community, the most public function – the social hub – is located adjacent to the main staircase, at the most centralized point in the circulation atrium. This convergence of circulation and social functions has proven to be very conducive to staff interaction.

In order to maximize natural light while adhering to sustainable design features, detailed 3-D models, sun path studies, building sections, and energy analysis models were developed and analyzed to inform the final design configuration of the west façade shading system and glazing. The design solution creates a carefully designed, glazed west-facing façade which allows very controlled, diffused natural daylight directly into the circulation atrium and deeply into the lab, office, and interaction spaces beyond.

The interior spaces were designed with extensive interior glazing to display the advanced laboratory technology and innovation that is central to Roche’s business success and corporate culture, as well as to allow for the deep penetration of natural light. The Design Team combined very clean, European modernist materials and furnishings with a warm palette of neutral hues and accent colors rooted in the native Indiana landscape.

As the result of the client’s tech-based culture and high design aspirations, the design team employed a rigorous, multidisciplinary, sustainable design approach to create an uplifting, technologically advanced facility that inspires its scientific staff and expresses its culture of scientific innovation.

HealthNow New York

Prominently located next to the New York Niagara Section Thruway on an abandoned brownfield site, the largest building in 20 years in Buffalo helped encourage economic development in the area. The design utilizes an 1859 stone façade to maintain historic preservation of the site’s past while incorporating a curved glass curtain wall. The curtain wall not only offers magnificent views of Lake Erie, but its southern exposure provides a valuable component of the building’s sustainable design.

The north, east, and west façades are a detailed colored architectural precast concrete with large window openings, recalling brick waterfront warehouses.  The entry plaza reflects the shifted city grids of the waterfront and downtown. The building is set back from the thruway, allowing the site development of a landscaped “greenway”, and screening a 1,500-car employee parking structure with an enclosed employee pedestrian bridge connection.

Sustainable design features include the development of an urban brownfield site; the southern glass curtain wall with low-e glazing and sunscreens with motorized shades and light sensors for solar control, day lighting and views; energy efficient mechanical and electrical systems; and the use of “green” building materials and construction practices.

Limited Army Aviation Support Facility

This new facility services three aviation units, utilizing three UH-60 Blackhawks and two 0H-58 Kiowa helicopters. The hangar portion of the facility is comprised of three heated maintenance bays and two unheated aircraft storage bays. The adjoining office area houses administrative areas, an aviation life support equipment shop, lockers, restrooms, and training areas.

One of the major challenges presented to the project team was the need to comply with the FAA’s building height limitation requirements while accommodating the minimum height required by the Indiana National Guard’s aviation equipment. Due to these constraints, the hangar structure was limited to a total height of 13′-4″.

This facility was the first of three phases in a $25.5 million, federally funded project “intended to enhance the Indiana National Guard’s ability to successfully perform its missions, from fighting world-wide terrorism to providing support in time of natural and manmade disasters to the citizens of Indiana.” The facility earned the Army’s SPiRiT Silver self-certified rating and gave the Guard much-needed access to the Chicago/northwest Indiana metropolitan area.

Cummins Office Building

The building design focuses on sustainable features, including a highly detailed southern exposure curtain wall.  The articulated glass curtain wall features floor to ceiling windows which provides day-lighting and exterior views throughout.

Primarily planned for an open office workplace with internal offices, the upper floors have a central building core.  Glass enclosed conference rooms are located on the southeast and southwest corners with great views of the downtown square.  A flexible employee dining and conference center are located on the first floor southeast corner, with direct access to the adjacent Commons food court.

The primary emphasis for the open office workplace is natural light and expansive views out.  The southern façade daylighting is controlled with louvered sunscreen shading, shades, and photocell controlled perimeter lighting.  The western windows are shaded with vertical sun fins and occasional translucent glass.  The clear glass is insulated with low-e coating.  Energy-efficient lighting and mechanical systems were critical for lower operating costs.

Three years after the initial building was completed, a five-story addition was built adjacent to the existing building. The exterior façades were designed with varying heights in order to allow for a four-story atrium that joins the two buildings and a three-story front on the north side of the building to match the adjacent Commons building. The fourth floor of the addition features a corner terrace and a vegetated green roof. CSO collaborated with Koetter Kim Architects and Associates to design the original building and the addition.

Geddes Hall

The building features the University’s traditional blend of brick colors with light colored cast stone accents, copper gutters and downspouts, and a slate roof.  The façade is punctuated with regularly spaced operable windows.  The detailed profile of these windows exactly match the historic wood windows installed in the two buildings adjacent to the project, which were built in the 1940’s.  The Geddes windows, however, reinterpret the window design in long lasting, energy efficient, and maintenance free anodized aluminum frames with high performance glazing.

The interior is distinctly arts and crafts inspired.  Warm yellows, earthy reds, and muted deep green colors are used throughout the building giving it a cozy earthy character.  Wood wainscoting used heavily in the public spaces adds to the building’s inviting nature and historic feel.  Informal gathering spaces of various sizes are found throughout the building.  Of particular note is the student library, found on the first floor, which features a fireplace centered along the north wall flanked by traditional built-in bookcases and classic arts and crafts furniture.  Two of the other focal points on the first floor are the chapel and coffee house, located just off the building’s main entrance.