Carr Workplaces – Friendship Heights

Carr Workplaces was looking to refresh their Friendship Heights location and breathe new life into their brand. Leadership wanted a sophisticated look with vibrant colors and artwork. This combination paired with the exposed structure creates an urban feel unique to the historic suburban neighborhood. The renovated space proudly displays Carr’s hospitality roots, and emphasizes the arrival sequence with a casual café. The café serves both visitors and space occupants equally and brings a new active energy to the lobby. From the lobby, finely tuned conference spaces are immediately available. The reused glass entries of the conference spaces add dimension and site lines to the exterior views while artfully filtering the natural light.

Beyond the lobby, curated and original art created by the design team continues the color story. The sophisticated and neutral finish palette allow the vibrant colors and artwork to grab your attention. The resurfaced suite doors contribute to the more youthful aesthetic, and make the cinnamon stain typically found in the era become a thing of the past.

Westfield High School

When the community supported WWS in their endeavor to address growing facility needs throughout the district with approval of a referendum, the largest allocation was put toward expanding the existing high school. Administrators saw this as an opportunity to not only address the needs of growing programs and an aging building, but to transform its education model and align the built environment with their pedagogical vision.

CSO studied existing facility use and programming information to quantify space utilization and projected student and program growth. Using CSO’s data, administrators decided to make the leap to a university model of education, allowing them to increase building efficiency and maximize the use of their budget to benefit as many parts of the building and programs as possible. In addition to this shift in space usage, WHS sought to accommodate growing demand for career ready programs, provide flexible areas for student use, and create spaces where students would want to spend time. All new and renovated spaces were designed to easily adapt to future program needs by minimizing built-in fixtures and maximizing use of mobile and flexible furniture. CSO worked closely with WHS to establish an aesthetic that mirrored the new educational direction with a high-tech, industrial feel while maintaining subtle touches that are distinctly Westfield.

The collaborative process between WHS and CSO and in-depth programming was critical to the success of this project. This approach allowed WHS to accomplish so much more than a traditional approach to projected growth would have allowed. The resultant custom tailored building will better support today’s students and staff in their endeavors and allow WHS to adapt to an unknown future much more readily and rapidly.

Basketball Locker Room

Upon the successful completion of the Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall addition project, the Indiana University Athletic Department discovered an opportunity to enhance an area of underutilized space within the building. The space located under the lower bowl was being utilized for storage, back of house restrooms, and various ancillary needs. With direct access to the basketball court, it made sense to reclaim this space as game day locker rooms, a players lounge, shower/restrooms, and coaching conference spaces – all of which did not previously exist within the facility.

After early discussions with the University it became apparent this space needed to be on par with many of the universities IU competes with for talent. The current coaching staff indicated that, while the space needed to be improved, there was also a strong desire to have it be modest. Above all requirements, the space needed to speak to the rich history of Indiana University Basketball with an eye to the future.

In order to meet the goals for the project, the design team incorporated wood, limestone, and back painted glass as the foundation of the finish palette. These finishes would serve as a clean backdrop to the iconic branding components found in the furnishings and implemented throughout the design. The overall composition created the motivational and energetic space required to attract new athletes, while reminding them of the honor involved in representing IU.

In a press release, Coach Archie Miller stated, “As a program we want our players to experience the best of the best, and as we took inventory on how we wanted to do things as a new staff, one of the things we really approached was a new area for our team and creating an environment that is cutting edge and second to none. I think that’s what we have been able to create here.”

Brownsburg High School Renovation and Addition

Following a series of community engagement sessions in 2016, the Brownsburg Board of School Trustees decided that in order to address enrollment growth in grades 9-12 and failing infrastructure at Brownsburg High School, it was necessary to expand and renovate the school.

New academic, administrative, athletic, foodservice, and building support spaces will increase the capacity of the high school to 3,000 students and allow for future growth of an additional 1,000 students. Major demolition of a significant portion of the existing building provided the opportunity to add 23% more classroom space, expand auditorium seating to accommodate approximately 995 people, and improve overall corridor circulation. The demolished area was rebuilt taking a portion of the building from a single story to two stories housing classrooms and taller spaces such as the cafeteria and Large Group Instruction rooms.

An existing auditorium was transformed into a true performing arts theater. The new theater design involved expanding the auditorium with new sloped and stadium seating, a new orchestra pit, front of stage area, overhead catwalks, and new lighting and sound systems.

The school has been operational throughout the entire construction process, which has occurred in phases to lessen the impact on students.

Wells Quadrangle Residence Halls and Dining Facility

Wells Quadrangle is comprised of four buildings, including Memorial Hall and Goodbody Hall. The project involved repurposing both buildings from academic space to student housing. The University also wanted to determine the best location to accommodate a dining facility with an outdoor terrace. Originally, IU had targeted space in one of the other buildings in the quad, but a study led by CSO determined that an addition to Goodbody Hall would be the best solution to accommodate a 200-seat dining facility.

The design of the addition to Goodbody Hall required a solution that integrated seamlessly into the architectural character of Wells Quadrangle. The 1-story addition emerges from the base of the existing Goodbody Hall, and houses a dining area with open views toward the quad.  A roof terrace above is accessed from both the exterior grade and the second level.  This elevated terrace provides options for outdoor seating and a sweeping overlook to the quad.

The overall project required careful coordination to maximize usable space while accommodating updated MEP systems and the technology infrastructure demanded by today’s residence halls.

The renovation created accommodations for 174 students. The room configuration is comprised of a mix of 2-bedroom apartments, 2-bedrooms suites, single rooms, and double rooms. A variety of restroom configurations are available depending on the room type.

Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall

When Indiana University set out to improve the iconic Assembly Hall, they prioritized the preservation of the original aesthetic while challenging the design team to develop a bold, yet respectful expansion that closely aligned with the architectural character of the original structure. Contextual influences drove a design solution that integrated the new addition into the existing structure holistically with a reverent architectural expression that closely relates to the original.

A new atrium space allows views between the entry and main concourse. This is the center of the new space and features a reinvented version of Athlete’s Hall and a panoramic window allowing views into the arena. The new arrival area supports existing traditions while offering a space for new traditions, events, and ceremonies to take place. The new entry is conveniently located, and visible escalators create a clear and efficient means for moving spectators through the space into the arena. A new Box Seat Club offers an exceptional viewing experience of events. CSO collaborated with SmithGroup to complete this project.

CSO subsequently completed the Roberts Family Indiana Basketball Team Center and Mark Cuban Center for Sports Technology located within Assembly Hall.

VisionLoft

VisionLoft responds to the growing tech culture and the need for event space in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. The building was built in 1908 as a livery with dirt floors, stables, and a shop-front. The property had undergone at least two conversions and had an uncertain past. The owners turned to CSO’s designers to guide them through a renovation to achieve a creative meeting hub in the city.

Exploratory demolition revealed brick walls and a wood ceiling consistent with the building’s age. Existing carpet was removed to expose a poured concrete floor most likely from the 1980’s. Two skylights and a fireplace were also repaired and are featured elements in the space.

The design team selected airy fixtures and furniture pieces to keep light moving through the space and introduced quirky tiles to keep the space modern and lighthearted. The industrial shell is juxtaposed against a moss wall and custom-made planter wall to give the back door privacy but allow light to filter in from both ends of the building. The space features all wireless technology, an interactive touch video wall, dual screen projectors, and more.

CSO’s collaboration with the owners resulted in a truly unique space in downtown Indianapolis for interactive meetings, ideation sessions, weddings, and more. The owners worked with Purposeful Design to design and fabricate the custom planter wall. Purposeful Design is a local not-for-profit whose mission is to help rebuild lives of individuals broken by addiction or homelessness, equip them with valuable work skills, and provide the gift of work training.

Center Grove Innovation Center

Center Grove’s new Innovation Center is a hub for 21st Century learning focused on preparing students of all ages for careers in STEM fields. The Center provides a student-centered learning environment with space for a variety of student experiences including: project-based learning, community partnerships, high-level problem solving, innovative collaborative learning, and cutting edge technology.

The first phase of the project includes a robotics lab to serve as the home to the award-winning Red Alert Robotics team. Prior to the renovation, the robotics team had to test their machines in the high school hallways or empty classrooms. The new design provides ample space for fabrication/tools, assembly/testing, and a full-sized practice pit.

The second phase of the design includes a central organizing “Collaboration Zone” between three large classroom labs dedicated to Basic, Advanced, and Industrial STEM activities and three large-group areas for CAD/computer activities, design exercises, media-based collaboration, and discussions. The flexible spaces accommodate all ages, from elementary students learning with Lego ™ components, to high school students using advanced 3D printing and manufacturing processes.

The STEM labs are open to each other and can be divided to accommodate individualized activities with adjacent break-out spaces for smaller groups. Specific colors designate each STEM lab and extend out into the Collaboration Zone to easily orient young learners. Teachers are able to use electronic tablets to display information on TV screens located around the experiment room or stream videos of an experiment or activities so that all students are able to see it.

Columbus North High School

The goals for Columbus North High School included: flexible and adaptable learning spaces; an easily accessible, technology-rich environment; teacher and student work areas that inspire creativity, collaboration, problem solving, and innovation; the development of Centers of Excellence; and a safe and comfortable learning environment.

The project consists of 125,000 square feet of new additions and extensive renovations. By relocating the building entry to the opposite side and strategically placing building additions, the existing high school was transformed to fully address current needs and anticipate future needs. In order to bring the school up to current standards, five separate additions provide new space for music/performing arts, administrative areas, a new kitchen, additional classrooms, student resource and teacher resource areas, and for C4, a career and technical training center that serves multiple counties.

Interior renovations include the reconfiguration of existing areas to better accommodate the existing use of the space or to accommodate a new use for the space. Renovations of the first floor include the relocation of the existing cafeteria and kitchen areas, the relocation of the media center, new and/or renovated restrooms, and two new science labs.

Mark Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology

Housed on the main level of the west side of Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall, the Cuban Center provides Media School students with work opportunities, internships, and instruction in the use of advanced sports media technology. Students produce high-quality professional content for IU Athletics, including live event broadcasts for all 24 IU sports, virtual reality videos for fan experience, athlete instruction, recruiting videos and social media, video board displays, and team specific shows.

The spaces that make up the Cuban Center include a virtual reality TV studio, video editing room, sound editing room, conference room, photography studio, media storage room, and offices for the Indiana University Sports Media Department. Court-level renovations were necessary to accommodate a supporting control room and server room.

The Center is designed to be very modern, open, visible, and collaborative while still maintaining sound control by utilizing sound-resistant glass walls to separate spaces.

Center Grove High School

The Center Grove Community School Corporation engaged CSO to undertake a 220,000 square foot renovation project at Center Grove High School. In addition to updating aging classrooms, the school corporation called on CSO to transform their traditional library into a vital, technology-rich student center which also houses the offices of their new global studies program.

CSO’s design includes informal student learning areas throughout the building that provide students with multiple venues and opportunities for collaboration. The new design included the creation of a student commons through the center of the building that will help improve traffic flow on the main floor of the facility as well as providing small collaboration areas, project rooms, a large presentation space, computer labs, and a student coffee bar.

In addition to the media center, the full scope of the project included upgraded finishes for all classrooms and offices throughout the building as well as relocation of the main office, new secure entries, renovation of science labs, improved circulation, and accessibility upgrades.

Columbus East High School

Columbus East High School was designed in 1970 as a high school whose traditional program was delivered through a large seminar, small group study delivery system. Over the years the school has moved to a more traditional high school schedule but has retained the culture of openness and flexibility.

Building improvements and expansions were designed to retain the character of the original design, both internally and externally. The building entrance was relocated to the east side of the building to increase its visual presence and to allow a direct, accessible route into the building. The entire second floor was renovated and reconfigured to eliminate undersized classrooms and small, cramped storage spaces – resulting in an open, flexible student collaboration space with ample daylighting. New technology was installed in each classroom. New flexible furniture was incorporated into the new learning spaces. A new administrative wing and ten additional classrooms were included in the project. To provide adequate collaboration and work space for the faculty, each faculty member was provided a personal work space. The faculty spaces are grouped together to allow small groups of faculty to collaborate within their own space.

The existing pool structure was completely renovated and the pool replaced. A new addition to the PE and athletic building provides space for the school’s fitness and wrestling programs. An upgraded mechanical system allows improved zoning and year-round heating and cooling.

Biddle Hotel and Conference Center

Located just steps from the iconic Sample Gates, the Biddle Hotel provides visitors and distinguished guests of the University with an opportunity to experience Hoosier hospitality at its finest.

The renovations at Biddle focused on enhancing the simple elegance of the boutique hotel as well as bringing the telecommunications infrastructure up to current standards. Upgrades included new finishes in the hotel’s guest rooms, suites, and corridors as well as the reconfiguration of bathrooms to improve accessibility. Additionally, the 1,320 square foot Federal Room was refreshed with new carpeting. The Metz Suite, which occupies the entire sixth floor of Indiana Memorial Union and is used for accommodating distinguished guests and visitors, also received renovations to its window treatment, cabinets, and woodwork. CSO provided architecture and interior design services to update the hotel.

Rose-Hulman Ventures

Rose-Hulman Ventures takes educational hands-on projects to a whole new dimension. Its unique operational model for university and industry interaction bridges the gap between research and the marketplace. When students walk through the doors at Rose-Hulman Ventures, they enter a model of the industrial world.

CSO and Garmong Construction provided design-build services for this $1.8 million renovation of an existing 30,000 square foot building. The project was phased to keep the building fully operational at all times during construction. The building renovation included all of the mechanical labs, electrical labs, chemical labs, and fabrication areas along with the creation of an interactive software lab, new administrative office and reception area, and a fully operational machine shop. Additionally, an existing break room was converted into a state-of-the-art multi-purpose tiered presentation space for 80 people.

Joint Force Headquarters

The 79,111 square foot renovation and 76,342 square foot addition was designed to develop a more efficient operation center by consolidating units associated with the headquarters which were located at other facilities and buildings at Stout Field. The facility houses the Indiana Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters, Indiana Air National Guard, Indiana Army National Guard Recruiting and Retention Battalion, and the 38th Infantry Division Band.

The multi-building renovation and additions improved building aesthetics and sustainability while preserving the history of the facility. The renovated buildings were kept fully operational throughout construction. The renovation of Building 9 is a hangar with two-story office wings that was built at the beginning of World War II. The building is eligible for listing on the National Register and was reviewed by the State Historic Preservation Office.

Joshi Performance Hall

From the onset of this performance hall project, the design team was challenged to think outside of the box to craft a solution that would meet the demanding requirements of the Ernestine M. Raclin School of Music students and faculty within a very tight budget and time frame. The conversion of an existing lecture hall and its adjacent spaces into a state-of-the-art recital hall is the culmination of the Joshi family’s vision to provide young musicians and singers excellent educational and career development opportunities at IUSB. Indiana University turned to CSO for their performing arts expertise after the original design team was unable to provide a solution within budget. CSO’s design incorporates an electronic architectural sound system that provides optimal acoustical characteristics within the confines of the existing space without major, costly physical modifications.

Each element of the design supplements the integrated sound system, in order to achieve a harmonious balance of sound and “sparkle”. The formerly carpeted walls are now clad in rich wood paneling and acoustic diffusion systems which add physical and acoustical warmth to the space. Deep red tapestry has been integrated into the side walls to add an air of sophistication to the space. All of the elements work together and create an experience for every patron, allowing them to be completely enveloped by the art being performed on stage. The performance hall provides a world class venue for chamber music, soloist, and small ensemble performances in addition to providing the use of state-of-the-art recording equipment for students and faculty.

Homestead High School

Over the last several years the administration at Southwest Allen County Schools (SACS) began to dream about making major changes at Homestead High School (HHS). Primarily a single story building, students struggled to travel from one side to another during passing periods and there were few spaces able to facilitate informal student interactions or collaborative group work.

CSO was brought on board with local architect MKM and educational consultant Brain Spaces to begin programming and planning for the future Homestead. Extensive meetings with students, staff, parents, and community members quickly revealed immense support for changes at the high school and a desire for the building to better represent and support the students who walked its hallways. The design team collaborated to maximize the amount of new space to be constructed while leveraging portions of the existing facility to reach the desired program requirements.

The resultant design will include a new two story academic wing, large student commons, 3,000 seat completion gym, and 990 seat performing arts center. Nearly 400,000 sf will be added on to the existing high school before razing roughly 350,000 sf of existing structure. The remaining 300,000 sf will be extensively renovated ensure the ‘new’ building has the same look, feel, and function throughout.

Completing a project of this scale while keeping the existing building operational during construction will be a complex task requiring continued coordination between SACS, HHS, the design team, and the construction manager. The phased addition, renovation, and demolition is set to occur from July 2020 through December 2024. Once complete Homestead High School will finally have space to educate students for generations to come.

Read Hall

Beginning with experienced chefs and food service teams, the goal was to bring enhanced experiences including better meals, better catering options, and expanding course options to include learning home living skills, meal and food prep, and world food cultures.  To support that goal, IU needed a new facility for catering that included cooking, baking, refrigeration and freezer storage, dishwashing, assembly and prep areas, and a full working kitchen.

Attached to the working kitchen, a student learning space with 5 team learning stations creates a classroom for approximately 20 to 25 students for demonstrations and hands on learning – similar to that found in a culinary program or school. All students can observe the work in the classroom, which is also equipped with video capabilities for recording and distance learning.

The design implementation challenges included the constraints of the space in a 1952 six-story residential dormitory building. Special skill was required to include seven exhaust hoods and make-up air equipment in an existing limited first floor space, with dormitory spaces above.  The geometry of the available areas, a raised concrete floor area in the middle of the proposed kitchen, and the limits of the structural grid required a unique approach for the plan and equipment layouts. Through collaboration by team members and University staff, the project succeeded in meeting the working needs of the catering staff, despite the limits.