Tri-North Middle School

Monroe County Community School Corporation (MCCSC) identified the need to replace the aging Tri-North Middle School. CSO and BrainSpaces, an expert in brain-based educational planning and design, led a visioning and programming process that enabled CSO to design a new building tailored to the specific needs and vision of Tri-North students, teachers, and administrators.

The building layout utilizes next generation learning elements including an open media center, collaboration spaces, and small group rooms throughout the building. Teachers and administrators expressed the need for spaces to be flexible and adaptable to a rapidly changing educational world. CSO’s design addresses the need for flexibility by implementing features such as the use of operable theater seating in the Performance / Large Group Instruction space, operable partitions in Science and STEM labs, and spaces that are planned to facilitate the use of both departmental and interdisciplinary teaching models.

MCCSC also emphasized the need for sustainable design considerations which were implemented with plans for a geothermal system, solar array on the gym roof, and use of local materials and native plants. The leadership of MCCSC is excited for the New Tri-North Middle School to be the crown jewel for this Bloomington community.

Westfield High School

When the community supported WWS in their endeavor to address growing facility needs throughout the district with approval of a referendum, the largest allocation was put toward expanding the existing high school. Administrators saw this as an opportunity to not only address the needs of growing programs and an aging building, but to transform its education model and align the built environment with their pedagogical vision.

CSO studied existing facility use and programming information to quantify space utilization and projected student and program growth. Using CSO’s data, administrators decided to make the leap to a university model of education, allowing them to increase building efficiency and maximize the use of their budget to benefit as many parts of the building and programs as possible. In addition to this shift in space usage, WHS sought to accommodate growing demand for career ready programs, provide flexible areas for student use, and create spaces where students would want to spend time. All new and renovated spaces were designed to easily adapt to future program needs by minimizing built-in fixtures and maximizing use of mobile and flexible furniture. CSO worked closely with WHS to establish an aesthetic that mirrored the new educational direction with a high-tech, industrial feel while maintaining subtle touches that are distinctly Westfield.

The collaborative process between WHS and CSO and in-depth programming was critical to the success of this project. This approach allowed WHS to accomplish so much more than a traditional approach to projected growth would have allowed. The resultant custom tailored building will better support today’s students and staff in their endeavors and allow WHS to adapt to an unknown future much more readily and rapidly.

Rose-Hulman Ventures

Rose-Hulman Ventures takes educational hands-on projects to a whole new dimension. Its unique operational model for university and industry interaction bridges the gap between research and the marketplace. When students walk through the doors at Rose-Hulman Ventures, they enter a model of the industrial world.

CSO and Garmong Construction provided design-build services for this $1.8 million renovation of an existing 30,000 square foot building. The project was phased to keep the building fully operational at all times during construction. The building renovation included all of the mechanical labs, electrical labs, chemical labs, and fabrication areas along with the creation of an interactive software lab, new administrative office and reception area, and a fully operational machine shop. Additionally, an existing break room was converted into a state-of-the-art multi-purpose tiered presentation space for 80 people.

Seng-Liang Wang Hall

The 4-story, 147,000 square foot building is designed to house research and laboratory space for Purdue’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as 22,000 square feet of commercially-leased retail space and 60,000 square feet of Class A office space. Its beautiful common areas include an open, light-filled 4-story atrium and indoor and outdoor gathering and seating areas.

The building received LEED New Construction Gold certification recognizing Wang Hall’s best-in-class “green” building strategies and practices. The building was completed on a sustainable project site and is located in a community setting within existing residential and commercial infrastructure. In addition, the building and site were designed to minimize the impact of urban heat islands on neighboring developments and habitats. The design is mindful of both water efficiency and energy efficiency, and was designed with low-flow and high-efficiency flush and flow fixtures to reduce potable water use within the building.

Geddes Hall

The building features the University’s traditional blend of brick colors with light colored cast stone accents, copper gutters and downspouts, and a slate roof.  The façade is punctuated with regularly spaced operable windows.  The detailed profile of these windows exactly match the historic wood windows installed in the two buildings adjacent to the project, which were built in the 1940’s.  The Geddes windows, however, reinterpret the window design in long lasting, energy efficient, and maintenance free anodized aluminum frames with high performance glazing.

The interior is distinctly arts and crafts inspired.  Warm yellows, earthy reds, and muted deep green colors are used throughout the building giving it a cozy earthy character.  Wood wainscoting used heavily in the public spaces adds to the building’s inviting nature and historic feel.  Informal gathering spaces of various sizes are found throughout the building.  Of particular note is the student library, found on the first floor, which features a fireplace centered along the north wall flanked by traditional built-in bookcases and classic arts and crafts furniture.  Two of the other focal points on the first floor are the chapel and coffee house, located just off the building’s main entrance.

Indianapolis Fire Station #5

This new firehouse is home to Engine 5, Tactical 5, IEMS Medic 5, Battalion 1, IFD Arson Investigation and the IFD Public Information Officer. The design includes five apparatus bay positions with two being drive-through lanes, dormitories, locker rooms, home theater room, workout room, commercial kitchen, and separate quarters for the battalion chief.

The Collapse Rescue Tactical Unit includes a classroom and workshop, along with indoor and outdoor collapse rescue simulators. The simulators provide opportunities for the CRT Unit to train within confined spaces, trenches, fluid tanks, a collapsed material maze, and a simulated partial building collapse for compromised openings and heavy structure collapse.

The City of Indianapolis, Department of Public Safety, and Indianapolis Fire Department entered into a build-to-suit agreement with a private development company to develop the new Indianapolis Fire Station No. 5 on a lease-to-own basis.

Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus

A new main building for Ivy Tech’s Columbus campus is designed to reinvigorate the campus, while adding to Columbus’ modern architectural legacy. The new building will give students and faculty a more engaging and collaborative 21st century learning space. Classrooms will be structured for project-based learning, with reconfigurable classrooms to promote collaboration. The project is sponsored by the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, who selected IwamotoScott Architects as the Design Architect. Ivy Tech Community College hired CSO as their Architect-of-Record. The new building will replace the aging Poling Hall in the Columbus AirPark.

Park Tudor Wellness Center

The new Irsay Family Sports Center for Health and Wellness will include a fieldhouse, auxiliary gym, multipurpose studio, weight and cardio fitness room and seminar classroom, and community spaces for students to gather. Activities in the building are intentionally displayed to encourage interaction, communication, and wellness on campus. The building design incorporates limestone, metal panel, and wood elements in keeping with the existing campus. The new wellness center replaces an existing sports facility and is scheduled to open in November 2021. CSO partnered with Lake|Flato on this exciting project.

Read Hall

Beginning with experienced chefs and food service teams, the goal was to bring enhanced experiences including better meals, better catering options, and expanding course options to include learning home living skills, meal and food prep, and world food cultures.  To support that goal, IU needed a new facility for catering that included cooking, baking, refrigeration and freezer storage, dishwashing, assembly and prep areas, and a full working kitchen.

Attached to the working kitchen, a student learning space with 5 team learning stations creates a classroom for approximately 20 to 25 students for demonstrations and hands on learning – similar to that found in a culinary program or school. All students can observe the work in the classroom, which is also equipped with video capabilities for recording and distance learning.

The design implementation challenges included the constraints of the space in a 1952 six-story residential dormitory building. Special skill was required to include seven exhaust hoods and make-up air equipment in an existing limited first floor space, with dormitory spaces above.  The geometry of the available areas, a raised concrete floor area in the middle of the proposed kitchen, and the limits of the structural grid required a unique approach for the plan and equipment layouts. Through collaboration by team members and University staff, the project succeeded in meeting the working needs of the catering staff, despite the limits.